What’s hot… and what’s not

You have no idea. We do. Let us learn you.

What’s Hot:

Aquatic Life

The outpour of support for aquatic life can be found here. And here. Basically it’s all anyone can talk about nowadays. Hop on the bandwagon and visit an aquarium. Sharks are dope. They kill people, but they are also endangered? Scary but sensitive. Dual-motha-fucking-threat. Like the aquatic Miley Cyrus. Even Lupita Nyong’o wore a dress made entirely out of the jewels of the sea.

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College Basketball

College Basketball. So hot right now. College Basketball. This prediction has been made before. There’s something about the calendar turning to March that makes everyone suddenly interested in college hoops.

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Fifth annual Brown Unplugged competition begins Sunday

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Sunday marks the beginning of this year’s Brown Unplugged competition, an annual energy competition that pits dorms against each other to see which community can reduce its energy consumption by the greatest percentage. Now in its fifth year, the competition will run for three weeks, through March 21st. Last year, with 750 registered participants, Brown saved over 34,000 kWh of electricity during this period, amounting to $4,448 in savings. When the competition begins, energy stats and progress for the different buildings can be tracked on BuildingDashboard.

Brown EcoReps, a student group aiming to raise environmental awareness and sustainable living habits, is encouraging participation through incentives, prizes, and additional events during the competition, including LED lightbulb exchanges in the Blue Room every Friday during the event, as well as their second dodgeball competition. To encourage intra-dorm competition, the participants of the winning dorm will be awarded a pizza party and will be entered in a raffle to win prizes including Spring Weekend tickets.

Commit to conserve here.

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Duncan Sheik is coming to see Spring Awakening

Duncan Sheik ’92 is famous for, among other things, writing the music for the Tony-Award-winning musical Spring Awakening, which opened last night at Brown. Amelia Scaramucci ’17, who stars in the production as Wendla Bergmann, tweeted at Sheik that his alma mater is putting on the show.

Which caused him to start following her on Twitter… 11026363_10152647968372478_2040241754_n  

According to Scaramucci, this eventually led to an email from his manager notifying her that he would be coming on Saturday night, after which he will be leading a talk back about the show. Oh, the power of Twitter.

[Update: apparently Sheik is as excited to see us as we are to see him]

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Images via Amelia Scaramucci ’17. 


If the libraries were pop singers, who would they be?

The age-old question of which dining hall matches up with which rapper has at last been settled. Recently, a new comparison arose in my mind: what about the Brown libraries and pop singers? See below for the final ten pairings. [Ed’s note: We have ten libraries?!]

The Rock = Taylor Swift

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“I’ve got a blank space, baby, and I’ll write an essay in absolute quiet.”

The Rock is always there: dependable, eclectic, the “America’s sweetheart” of libraries. It could only possibly be paired with the adorably inane TSwift. Sure, it’s about as easy to complain that you’re spending way too much time at the Rock as you do listening to Taylor. Yes, after a while it begins to seem like they’re both just the same thing over and over, but stay away from either one and you’ll return to find something new and interesting, whether it’s a bloodthirsty new music video or a shelf entirely filled with strange sexual practices across history. In fact, the Rock might even be a bit more predictable than Swift, since you can generally count on the Rock to not have bangs, and to not suddenly remove all of its songs from Spotify. (Side note: They both, permanently or temporarily, reside in Rhode Island.)

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Sock and Buskin Presents: Twelfth Night

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For most Brown students, Shakespeare existed only in high school English classes; while his importance as a founding father of modern drama and comedy are drilled into our brains, his texts often remain inert to the modern reader.

To those who haven’t seen high-quality Shakespeare productions, welcome to a whole new world. To those who have and love it, welcome to your dream.

Twelfth Night, directed by Jane Nichols, is a well-oiled machine. Despite running two and a half hours, the show doesn’t ever lag. The actors are like frenetic puppets, weaving on and off stage with timed precision. The set, too, is moving; the stage, initially all but bare upon entering the theater, changes subtly but effectively to denote change of setting.

Nichols, an esteemed professor of at the Yale School of Drama and currently a visiting artist at Brown, is an obvious professional and the true star of the show, despite never appearing on stage. Her blocking is as tight as can be, and her knowledge of the text is clear from the start. Unlike many student productions of Shakespeare, it’s clear the actors know the exact meaning of the lines they’re delivering. When the actors know the meaning of their words, it’s much easier for the audience to wade through Shakespeare’s, at times, opaque text–and the jokes certainly land with surer footing. The actors are just as comfortable in group scenes as they are expertly delivering soliloquies that sometimes border on… lengthy.

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Shakespeare on the Green Presents: Spring Awakening

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It’s no secret that Brown students are brilliant. Just look at Duncan Sheik ’92, the songwriter behind the hit musical, Spring Awakening. This weekend, his work once again returns to his old stomping grounds as Shakespeare on the Green moves inside and presents its own rendition of the renowned show, directed by Jenn Maley ’16.

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The entire production is concise and unwaveringly honest. From the simple costumes, designed by Dylan Platt ’15 and Estée Feldman ’18, to the stark set, created by Rebecca Balton ’15, the physical aspects of the show further accentuate the rawness and darkness of the heavy topics that the script explores. Additionally, the intimate environment of the Rites and Reasons Theatre forces the audience to face the cast as they confront such intense topics as suicide and sexual assault. And, of course, I would be remiss if I did not recognize the pit, directed by Nick Healy ’17, who do a wonderful job of capturing the magic of Sheik’s phenomenal score.

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