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What’s In a Meal Credit? | The Blue Room

Whether you want to admit it or not, the end of the semester is upon us. For some, their hoard of meal credits has almost dwindled away. For others, the task at hand is almost insurmountable: spend 100+ meal credits in three weeks.

^actual pic of a Brown student during finals

Whatever your situation, VlogDH has you covered. Check out the video below to learn how one can best spend a meal credit in one of the most popular eateries on campus.

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What to do this week: November 30 – December 6


Monday, November 30 

Event: Into the Grind(s)
Location: The Underground
Time: 5:00 p.m. — 7:00 p.m.

“Come sample coffee varieties from around the world and learn about different brewing techniques and blends in the Underground Coffee Co.” This event is totally free and will feature informational sessions on brewing techniques at 5:00 p.m. and 5:30 p.m.

Tuesday, December 1

Event: UCS Open Forum
Location: Salomon 001
Time: 8:00 p.m.

The Undergraduate Council of Students will be moderating a forum on the Pathways to Diversity and Inclusion Plan. The event will include both an overview of the plan and a Q&A with the following administrators: Rick Locke, Maud Mandel, Liza Cariaga-Lo, Mary Grace Almandrez, & Janet Blume.

Wednesday, December 2

Event: In Transition: A Thayer Street Pop-Up Exhibition
Location: 271 Thayer Street (Where City Sports used to be)
Time: 2:00 p.m.

Come to the unveiling of this exhibition about Providence’s street art scene. Sponsored by Artbeat, this event will feature artists from the community.

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Know your Lecture Board candidates: Opal Tometi, Alicia Garza, and Patrisse Cullors

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From left to right: Alicia Garza, Patrisse Cullors, and Opal Tometi

In July 2013, George Zimmerman was acquitted from the charge of second-degree murder of 17 year-old Treyvon Martin. In response, Alicia Garza, an organizer and special projects director for the National Domestic Workers Alliance, took to her Facebook page to write a “love letter” to the black community, and a plea for all to recognize that “black lives matter.” Her friend, Patrisse Cullors, head of an advocacy organization for incarcerated people, repeated the phrase from her own social media accounts, adding a hashtag.

Opal Tometi, executive director of Black Alliance for Just Immigration, remembers reading Garza’s post after leaving a screening of Fruitvale Station and hearing that Zimmerman had been acquitted:  “Within this formation Alicia basically said, ‘Hey, we need to come together to understand this moment and provide some shared guidance, a reading, as well as a call to action for our people.’ Black Lives Matter is how she’d been talking about it. That really resonated with me.”

Together, the three women made #BlackLivesMatter a national mantra, dubbed by many the start of a second civil-rights movement. While the hashtag began as a way to promote demonstrations and rallies around the country in response to police brutality against black individuals, today Black Lives Matter is an organization with 26 national chapters. “Rooted in the experiences of Black people in this country who actively resist our de-humanization, #BlackLivesMatter is a call to action and a response to the virulent anti-Black racism that permeates our society” reads the organization’s website.

Although the movement began in response to the issues of police brutality, today Black Lives Matter is fighting for a greater cause, that “goes beyond extrajudicial killings of Black people by police and vigilantes.” Garza describes the organization and phrase as, “an ideological and political intervention in a world where Black lives are systematically and intentionally targeted for demise.  It is an affirmation of Black folks’ contributions to this society, our humanity, and our resilience in the face of deadly oppression.”

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The Lazyman’s Guide: Avoiding chores this Thanksgiving

For a lot of first years, this week will be the your first time home since the summer. And while you may have gotten used to having your only mug, which you drank tea from once at the beginning of the semester, unwashed, gross and chilling on your desk, your parents are not. You won’t only have to clean up after yourself (what does a bed look like when it’s been made, anyway?), but you can probably count on being asked to “help out around the house.” For the laziest of us, to whom the simplest chores may seem as difficult as running a marathon, here’s a guide to (dealing with) getting out of them.


  1. Play the Friends Card

Always, always, always have plans. When your dad asks you if you can rake the yard, say “Oh, but Sheila and I were going to catch up over coffee and my guess is it’s going to be a looooooong chat.” Emphasize how much you’ve missed your hometown friends, and how, because the break is so short, you want to pack as much time in as you can with as many people as possible. Don’t forget to throw in some long bit about how sad it is that the times when you are home will become rarer and rarer.

  1. Or Play the Sibling Card. It’s Even Better 

Parents are suckers for seeing their kids spend quality time together. If you have brothers or sisters, pay attention to them. Watch movies, give them lots of hugs, take your younger sister to lunch, etc. Pull at your parents’ heartstrings until they are afraid to ask you for help because it would disrupt your wonderful newfound fondness for your brother. And actually, sibling time can be really fantastic anyway– don’t take it for granted.

  1. Be one with the P-Set

So a lot of us may actually have a significant amount of work this Thanksgiving. Every time you are home and sense your mom might be about to allot you a chore, make sure you are working intensely on your APMA problem set. Take on the homework and take out the home work.

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A (Dorm at) Brown Thanksgiving


This year, East Side Marketplace ran a special where, after spending a certain amount of money from late October to early November, customers could turn in their receipts for a free turkey. My roommates and I, as four students off meal plan and with a kitchen, were able to get two after our weekly grocery trips. In other words, I finally had the perfect excuse to want to take on the challenge of cooking Thanksgiving dinner in a dorm room kitchen.

11:00 a.m., Sunday We head to East Side Marketplace, picking up our free turkeys (one of which we gave to another friend for her Thanksgiving dinner). It turns out the free turkeys were frozen, which would never thaw in one day, so we took a voucher to get $20 off of a refrigerated turkey breast (which cooks faster and was cheaper, so win-win there).

11:08 a.m. A very nice woman at the deli counter calls me “papa.” It’s going to be a good Thanksgiving indeed.

11:20 a.m. We pick up the other necessary items: stuffing, potatoes, cranberries.

11:33 a.m. It takes two employees plus myself to find gravy in a jar.

11:35 a.m. Found it.

11:55 a.m. We return and unpack our groceries. One of my roommates is a vegan and has prepared well for dinner later (see below).


Ah, Tofurkey.

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Pollerbears: Cranberry edition


Cranberries-1024x801Regardless of whether you’re staying on campus or headed elsewhere, your Thanksgiving break has officially arrived!

Want to know what’s on our mind? Cranberries. In honor of Thanksgiving, we want to know all about your cranberry consumption. How will you be celebrating your break in ~cranberry style~?

How will you be consuming cranberries this Thanksgiving break?

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