Brown Gilbert & Sullivan presents Camelot

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We are living in dark times. As Brown begins to enter this most trying of periods in the semester–with the riotous celebrations of Spring Weekend behind us and the ominous specter of finals beginning to loom–glad tidings may seem few and far between. In sooth, though the days may be longer and the weather warmer, we are but prisoners; chained to our desks, subsisting on a meager diet of Ratty take-out. These are dark times indeed.

But lo! Enter Brown University Gilbert and Sullivan‘s production of Camelot, a performance destined to uplift you from your dreary existence and fill your world with song and dance.

Although not a Gilbert and Sullivan work itself (Camelot was written by Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe), BUGS’s production has all the hallmarks of an organization whose mission statement is to perform the Victorian duo’s absurd, genre-defining musicals. A modern performance of a work written in the 1960s and set in the medieval era, Camelot specifically showcases the musical talent of BUGS, in particular the voices of leads Jamie Meader ’17, Alex Ashery ’16, and Emma Dickson ’16 (playing the roles of Arthur, Lancelot, and Guenevere respectively). Also on display are the impressive acting chops of Alex Cevallos ’14 as an insane King Pellinore and Celine Schmidt Brown/RISD ’17 as a particularly devious Mordred. At roughly three and a half hours, Camelot is on the longer side, but the diverse talent on display and the script itself–a ridiculous interpretation of the King Arthur legend–makes the runtime more than worth it.

Camelot is directed by Alec Kacew ’14, with assistant director Paul Martino ’17 and musical directors Jeff Ball ’17 and Anna Stacy ’17. It will be performed this upcoming weekend in Alumnae Hall on Pembroke, with showtimes at 8 p.m. tonight, 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. on Saturday, and 2 p.m. on Sunday. Tickets are free, but you can reserve them here.

If you enjoy the performance, remember to show BUGS some support by liking their Facebook page.

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