Keeping your New Year’s fitness resolution

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Ah it’s that time of the year again. Within the first couple of weeks in the semester, the Nelson is already drenched with teen spirit. Everybody wants to stick to what they resolved to do come midnight New Years Eve. And yet, so many will fail and revert back to old habits. Don’t be that person. Rise and flourish with Blog’s three-step guide on how to stick to your New Year’s fitness resolution.

1. Goals.

Let’s keep things real here. Without a goal, you’ll be walking around in circles and contemplating the meaning of life (and your resolution). The less abstract your goal, the better. Decide exactly what you want out of your New Years workout resolution. Are you looking to improve the pace on your morning jog? Trying to double your bench press, squat, and deadlift? A crucial component of setting goals is knowing where you are currently. Once your know where you currently stand, you can set a realistic goal so you won’t be frustrated a year from now.

2. Teamwork. As emphasized before, bringing a buddy to the gym will exponentially increase your results. You’re more motivated. You know someone’s got yo back. And you might even get a friendly competition going. During our daily lives, we get food and study with one another. So why not add going to the gym to the equation? On top of that, if you and some friends have similar New Year’s resolutions, you will likely develop some sort of routine with them. This will force everyone to keep each other dependable, and thus, strive towards the end goal.

3. Inspiration. At the end of the day, we’re spurred the most when we have some physical representation of what we want. Think back to passing the candy store as a kid as seeing those big-ass jawbreakers. You wanted those big-ass jawbreakers. So what did you do? You raked leaves, opened lemonade stands, and (occasionally) panhandled your parents for loose change. Such a cycle has repeated and will repeat itself in our lifetimes. Do the same for fitness. Find a role model that you appreciate. The key word here is “appreciate.” Sure, it’d be great to become them and have their body, strength, etc., but look more in-depth at their approach to fitness. Do you agree with their lifestyle, techniques, and, most importantly, values?

And there we have it. Set realistic goals, bring some friends along for the ride, and search far and wide for your fitness role model. With that being said, I’ll let my friend Arnold wrap this article up.

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