Dorm room cold remedies for brave souls

If you’ve been to any of your classes in the past month, you’ve heard the cough symphony that accompanies the infamous call cold season. As much as it sucks to have your class interrupted by a serial cougher, it probably sucks even more to be that cougher. We’ve all been there – actually, most of us are probably there right now.

You have likely already made a few trips to CVS to buy your cold mitigating staples, but have you considered trying something new? The internet offers a plethora of bizarre and non-traditional cold and sore throat remedies that you can try from the comfort of your own dorm room. Warning: some of these cures are weirder than others, and we cannot promise that any of these work, but does the internet ever lie? Send this to the the serial cougher in your life (or to the lady below…she needs help).

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Fear not, sad lady! The internet’s got you covered.

Try the “Wet Sock Treatment.”

This might possibly be the strangest cold and flu treatment out there. Apparently, if you sleep in cotton socks that have been soaked in ice water and then put a pair of wool socks on top of them, you can activate “the body’s defenses and reflexively increase circulation and decrease congestion in the upper respiratory passages, head and throat,” according to naturalhealthadvisory.com.  This remedy has also been referenced and endorsed by the healthy Dr. Katie Corazzo on the healthy lifestyle blog MindBodyGreen and by healthline.com.

Garlic

According to everydayroots.com, sucking on garlic can actually do a better job at getting rid of a sore throat than a cough drop. They advise that you slice one clove of garlic in half and put the two halves on either side of your mouth. One of our bloggers (read:me), recently tried this in a moment of desperation and it actually worked wonders. This is very easy to do, but beware that you might need to brush your teeth six times before leaving your room.

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What we learned at yesterday’s sexual assault lectures

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Last Friday, November 14, President Paxson sent out an email to the Brown community that addressed a number of concerns regarding university sexual assault policy and planning for the future. In particular, she called attention to the Janus Forum event that was to take place the following week, “Valenti/McElroy: How Should Colleges Handle Sexual Assault?” Paxson wrote:

“Some people–including writer Wendy McElroy, who will speak with Jessica Valenti at a Janus Forum event next week–have argued that sexual assault is the work of small numbers of predatory individuals whose behaviors are impervious to the culture and values of their communities. I disagree. Although evidence suggests that a relatively small number of individuals perpetrate sexual assault, extensive research shows that culture and values do matter. Societies that have strong norms against sexual assault have fewer assaults.”

Further, Paxson informed the community of an alternative event to “provide… more research and facts about these important issues.” This lecture, “The Research on Rape Culture,” given by Brown University Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior Lindsay Orchowski, Ph.D., would occur concurrently with the Janus Forum event, but in a different location. By initiating this alternative to the Janus Forum, Paxson made a bold statement to the student body, faculty, and the Brown community: she offered us the option to educate ourselves through a fact-based presentation or to attend a discourse in which two contending speakers posed significantly different solutions to handling sexual assault on college campuses. The events differed in purpose, in lesson, and in nature.

Though both events were videotaped, it was intentionally impossible for any person to attend both. So if you went to one and not the other, or if you missed them altogether, we’ve got you covered. BlogDH sent one writer to the Janus Forum and another to “The Research on Rape Culture.” Here’s what we heard:

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BREAKING: President Paxson has a twin??

At BlogDH, we’re all about doppelgangers. We have a special doppelganger column, and we even welcomed a writer this semester who thinks that he’s Ellen DeGeneres. Thanks to a crucial news tip from a Blog alum, we have found the ultimate doppelganger pair that will shatter everything that you think you knew. We’re not sure how to conduct ourselves.

We have found a set of twins that will soon join the ranks of Mary Kate and Ashley, Tia and Tamera, and the Weasley twins if they haven’t already. We must also disclose that we’re almost positive these two people aren’t actually related. But one can dream.

Are you sitting down? Please do so before you proceed.

Screen shot 2014-11-07 at 1.03.55 PMMeet President Paxson’s twin, or known to most as Amy Klobuchar, a US Senator from Minnesota (D). You recognize her name because you read her book, Uncovering the Dome, in your City Politics class. You might also know her as Minnesota’s funniest senator….or maybe you know her because she is LITERALLY CHRISTINA PAXSON WITH AN ORANGE SCARF.

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Shut Out Trafficking comes to Brown this week

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The National Consortium for Academics and Sport (NCAS) has joined forces with the U.S. Fund for UNICEF’s End Trafficking Project to create Shut Out Trafficking, a program that seeks to educate students on ten college campuses across the country about the large prevalence of human trafficking in the United States. This week, Shut Out Trafficking will be hosting events at Brown.

According to Shut Out Trafficking at Brown’s Facebook event page, this project seeks to engage athletes in the issue of human trafficking and use athletics as a vehicle to address this critical concern head-on. The project also hopes to “implement programming designed to involve and support athletes, coaches, athletics administrators, and members of the general student body in raising awareness about and exposing the hidden injustices of human trafficking, both globally and on a domestic level.” The page also says that the goal of the project is to “empower campus communities to speak out honestly and take action against these abuses.”

There will be two events hosted this week. On Monday, November 3rd, there will be a two hour event entitled “Shut Out Trafficking in Society Through Sport” which features Dr. Richard Lapchick, a human rights activist and internationally recognized expert on sports issues, Sarah Willbanks from UNICEF USA, Sarah DeCataldo from Day One, David Cohen and Rebekah Conway Roulier from Doc Wayne, and Larkin Brown from Soccer Without Borders. The panel will take place at 6p.m. in Smitty-B Room 106.

On Thursday, November 6th, the Royce Fellowships at Brown, the Sport and Development Project at Brown, and the UNICEF Club at Brown will be screening “Not My Life,” a independent film by Robert Bilheimer that documents contemporary slavery. The event will be held at 6p.m. in Wilson 102.

Eli Wolff, the co-director of the Royce Fellowship for Sport and Society, an overseer of the Sport and Development Project at Brown, and the primary contact for this event at Brown told Blog, “We are so excited to have Dr. Lapchick on campus and to collaborate with UNICEF USA to engage the campus on this important and emerging topic. The power of sport can serve as a vehicle for education,  awareness and action in the realm of sport and human rights, development and social change.”
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FlogDailyHerald: An open letter to the Sayles Hall bathrooms

I asked everyone to leave so we could have our privacy.

I asked everyone to leave so we could have our privacy.

Dear Sayles Hall,

How are you? For 133 years old, you’re looking great. You’ve been a loving host to student group rehearsals, SPEC events, and The Housing Games (RIP). Heck, you have even been to SPG! Have I mentioned you have the largest remaining Hutchings-Votey pipe organ in the world?! Seriously, thnks4themmrs and way to be you.

Hey, there is something I’ve wanted to talk to you about. I’ve been on staff here at BlogDH for three years and have never written a Flog. I’ve never really wanted to because I hate complaining and I seek to see the glass half-full as frequently as possible. Until now.

I’m quite bad at confrontation and don’t want this to come as a shock to you. Please bear with me as I try to express my feelings. I will even try to speak from the “I” perspective. What I’ve been meaning to tell you is that your bathrooms are literally the worst thing about this entire institution for higher learning. 

Was that too harsh?

Let me explain myself. We can start by talking about the location of your facilities. Your only bathrooms are located in the basement of the building, which is an absurd amount of steps away from your third floor dungeon. I could also get into all of the sense that your stairs lack, but I digress.

Given my abnormally small bladder, I always face this dilemma as to whether I should commit myself to hiking the literal Oregon Trail to get to your facilities or if I should just suffer the bladder discomfort. Also, seriously my bad if I’m taking this the wrong way, but it seems that you are proud of this trek and wear it as a badge of honorable character. You really shouldn’t, Sayles. I dare you to have one more sign telling me that your only bathrooms are located in the basement. Also stop sugar-coating it by calling it “the lower level.” It is the basement.

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What we’re reading

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This past week, President Obama addressed the buzz about the Ebola virus in his weekly address entitled “What You Need to Know about Ebola” by saying that, “we can’t give in to hysteria or fear.” In the past few weeks, we’ve heard arguments for travel bans and other actions seeking to curb the spread of this virus to the United States. In Nate Silver’s “Why An Ebola Flight Ban Wouldn’t Work,” he maps out what a flight ban to West Africa would look like and why it would be ineffective.

On the topic of public health, have you ever thought about public wifi being a public health hazard? According to Mauritis Martijn, we might want to be more cautious when using a public Wi-Fi server. If you’re curious how a hacker can learn intimate details about strangers using public wifi or, like us, are terrified by the prospect of having some stranger looking at the last five things you googled, give “What we give away when we log on to a public Wi-Fi network” a read.

Another way to take care of yourself is to learn some serious hangover cures from some of the most famous heavy drinkers. Did you know that Zelda Fitzgerald’s hangover cure was to go for a morning swim? Or that Brenda Frazier would take a bottle of Coca-Cola, shake it, and then mix it with cold milk?

In education, two particular articles generated a great deal of discussion this week. The first being David Edwards’ “American Schools Are Training Kids for A World That Doesn’t Exist” which discusses what Edwards feels must change in our education system. He argues that we will have to shift from teaching students to “learn and then do” to a different framework that stresses discovery and adapting to an ever-changing world.

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