Brown Motion Pictures: Fall premiere

12274534_965414383505245_6225379561519027194_n

Brown Motion Pictures (BMP) hosted its fall premiere last night at the Avon Cinema. The event debuted the four student-led films that BMP produced this semester to a packed house. BMP members, Brown students, and people from the Providence community were all stylishly dressed as they checked their name off the ticket list and made their way to their seats. The smell of popcorn filled the lobby, where attendees were getting their pictures taken by event photographers.

The first film screened was Parkour! directed and written by Jenn Maley ‘16.

This hilarious mockumentary about the making of a parkour film will have you as out of breath as doing actual parkour. Brian Semel ‘16 is brilliant as Michael (an ode to Michael Scott, perhaps?)

See it for: If you have been missing The Office or Parks and Recreation, then this is a film you won’t want to miss! Also, bagels (you’ll get the reference when you see it).

The second film was Man In Suit directed by Errol Danehy ‘18 and written by Aubrie Redwine ‘18.

A more action-based comedy, Man In Suit takes a look at art imitating life and vice versa when an unlikely hero (Ben Silver ‘17) finds his own internal power via comic book.

See it for: Really cool film noir style flashbacks and music. Also shots of The Underground as a speakeasy-esque bar that will totally shock you.

The film was followed by circles directed by Marcus Sudac ‘17 and written by Kent Smith ‘16.

Continue Reading


A Guide to Olneyville: Tortilleria Inc. and Sanchez Mexican Market

Did you know that Providence is one of the few places in the world where you can find rained fish? In 1900, right in Olneyville, perch and pout fell from the sky, accumulating up to a bucket of sky-fallen fish. Many Brown students volunteer in Olneyville, usually through the Swearer Center, but how many of us are not acquainted with the area. As one of the oldest neighborhoods in Providence, Olneyville  is full of surprises, from raining fish to delicious hidden restaurants to quaint parks. 

One particular wonderful gem in Olneyville is Tortilleria Inc. a.k.a Sanchez Mexican Market. To get to Sanchez Mexican Market (177 Putnam Street) you can take the RIPTA 92 West. Olneyville is past Federal Hill, officially bordered by Atwells Ave, Route 10 and the Amtrak line, I-95, and Glenbridge Avenue. (See map below, Olneyville is bordered in red). The Atwells and Valley stop is officially the closest stop to the market, although you can request a stop at the RIPTA signs between Atwells and Valley and Atwells and Mt. Pleasant. 

Screen Shot 2015-12-01 at 8.31.54 PM

Continue Reading


Visiting Latinx student reports assault by DPS officer; Paxson and Latinx community respond

Around 12:30 a.m. Saturday morning outside Machado House, a senior delegate for this weekend’s Latinx Ivy League Conference was reportedly verbally harassed by two Department of Public Safety officers and then physically assaulted by one of the officers. Geovanni Cuevas, the student in question, was visiting from Dartmouth University and was staying in Machado House with a friend.

As a result of Cuevas’ experience, the Latinx Conference attendees cancelled planned events and discussions, and instead arranged an open meeting with President Christina Paxson P’19 and Mark Porter, Chief of Police for the Department of Public Safety. Following this meeting, both Russell Carey and President Paxson sent emails to the Brown community last night acknowledging the incident. Today, the Latinx Council convened again to discuss Paxson’s written plan for the University’s repsonse.

The meeting Saturday afternoon began at 1 p.m, with Paxson, Porter and Latinx delegates and supporters gathered in a crowded classroom in Salomon. Delegates formally presented Paxson with a list of demands to create a safe campus for students of color.

Paxson began by stating, “This will mainly be a time for listening, at least on my part.” Cuevas then gave the room his account of the incident outside Machado, explaining that he was “outside of the Machado party when a drunk student, stumbled outside.” Cuevas explained that the student “was confronted with flashlights and inappropriate touching” by the two DPS officers securing the event, “to which I had a very visceral response and said, ‘Hey, that’s inappropriate, you shouldn’t touch him like that.'”

The two officers then approached Cuevas and “proceeded to tell me that I was trespassing, despite the fact that I was a guest, hosted in that very house. As the situation escalated, I saw that my friends were uncomfortable, so I removed myself, but they told me I couldn’t come back to the house where I was being hosted. Obviously, I said that’s not going to happen, I’m sleeping here.”

When Cuevas went back in to the party through the back door, and went downstairs to find his host, he recalls that he “caught the attention of the security guard who was there.”  “Before I could even utter a sentence, I was grabbed, thrown up against the wall, thrown to the floor, told I was resisting when I wasn’t, scrapped on my face, told I was going to get pepper-sprayed,” he explained. “I was handcuffed and taken outside Machado, and detained there, until Brown students could come and verify my identity.”

Delegates of the Latinx Ivy League Conference then explained that the goal of their conference is “to empower the Latino students who have overcome cultural and structural challenges to attend Ivy League institutions.” Every year, around 80 students from these universities congregate to discuss “difficult topics that include race, gender, and socioeconomic factors effecting the Latino community in the United States.” However, the delegates had suspended the discussion of this year’s theme, Unity through Generations: the Past, Present and Future of Latino Leadership, to instead draft a list of demands for President Paxson.

“One of our delegates suffered violence at the hands of law enforcement hired by Brown. This incident recalls a longer history of institutionalized violence against communities of color,” said one Latinx delegate. The demands for President Paxson included:

Continue Reading


6 ways to beat “November Sadness”

Pumpkin-Del-ReyPumpkin-Del-Rey

Like Lana’s Summertime Sadness, except with more pumpkins.

The month of Halloween, otherwise known as October, is very much over. Though these spooky weeks brought spooky things (cold weather and midterms), the promise of end-of-month candy, parties, and costumes made it all worthwhile.  Now that October is gone, so is the illusion of prolonged and constant fun. Jack-O-Lanterns will be replaced with probably premature holiday decorations and the Monster Mash will be replaced with innumerable renditions of “Let It Go.” The sun will eventually start to set closer to the times that some of us wake up than to when we should be inside. What’s to keep a Brown student from just heeding Elsa’s advice and letting it all go? Blog offers you a couple of ideas!

1. Warm Drinks. October is still a bit too early to go hard on hot chocolate or apple cider. November? Bring on the hot stuff! If you are adventurous, December eggnog is just around the corner.

2.Thanksgiving break (!!!) October provided one restful and problematic long weekend. November will bring three extra turkey-filled days for you to enjoy with family, friends, Netflix, or for those of you who are ambitious, research to prepare you for finals [Ed. – noooooooooo]. Winter break is just long enough to help forget the pain of exams and allows for some well-deserved unwinding before the impending snow and homework take over second semester.

Continue Reading


Students organize Blackout at Brown and teach-in in solidarity with Mizzou

A few hundred students, dressed mostly in black, stood by the Van Wickle Gates at noon today to take a photo to show solidarity and support for Black students at the University of Missouri. Attendees remained huddled, some under umbrellas, to listen as several Black students, one by one, took to a megaphone to share their stories. They spoke about the institutional racism they had personally experienced, about the University’s refusal to value their existence and acknowledge their identities, and called for institutional changes to prevent future traumas and actualize equality on campus.

IMG_8098

Many students spoke about their own experiences with racism in the classroom. A first-year spoke about being in an MCM class in which the professor, after quoting a text, repeatedly used the n-word to refer to Black bodies. “It happened five times before I had to walk out,” he said. After tweeting about the incident, the student has met several times with school administrators, and said his professor sent out an email acknowledging her use of language. “But it wasn’t an apology. It was an excuse.”

Another student expressed frustration with having to continually meet with administrators about the perpetuation of institutional racism by faculty members. “I’m here because I’m tired,” they said. “I haven’t done schoolwork in months, but I’m meeting with administrators.” Others elaborated on the discomfort that many Black students feel in classrooms with professors that have made racially charged comments or have criticized the work of activists on campus. “Ken Miller, David Josephson, Ariella Azoulay, Glenn Loury — these people aren’t being punished, but we are.”

IMG_8125

IMG_7997

In reference to the email sent by President Christina Paxson P’19 and Richard Locke, one student asked, “Why did they all of the sudden send out that e-mail after Mizzou and Yale?” The letter, titled “Promoting a Diverse, Inclusive Academic Community,” was sent this Tuesday to the community. “Are they scared [of losing their jobs]?” the student continued. “They should be. I’m very tired of institutional racism. If it doesn’t stop, if free speech isn’t removed from this discussion, she should be afraid.” Another student added, “I just want to say that our humanity is not up for debate.” One speaker pointed out that it took a year for the University to put a “Do not touch” sign in front of the only slavery memorial on campus, although “white children played on it the day after it was put up.”

Continue Reading