Screen Shot 2015-12-16 at 11.34.57 AM

BlogDH Presents: Truckz: Mama Kim’s Edition

Ever wonder what it takes to feed hordes of hungry Brunonians who are fed up with the Ratty looking to eat off campus? So have we.

Last week, Caitlin from Blog and Arturo from Vlog teamed up to bring you an inside look (à la MTV’s Cribz) at one of the most beloved food trucks on campus, Mama Kim’s Korean BBQ.

Peep the vid below:

Reporting via Caitlin Dorman ’16 and Arturo Bory ’17.


Meal Credit -- Blue Room Thumb

What’s In a Meal Credit? | The Blue Room

Whether you want to admit it or not, the end of the semester is upon us. For some, their hoard of meal credits has almost dwindled away. For others, the task at hand is almost insurmountable: spend 100+ meal credits in three weeks.

^actual pic of a Brown student during finals

Whatever your situation, VlogDH has you covered. Check out the video below to learn how one can best spend a meal credit in one of the most popular eateries on campus.

Image via.


Dessert Panini Thumb

Avec Meal Plan: Ratty Dessert Panini

Step aside soft-serve ice cream. There’s a new dessert game in town.

Inspired by the always iconic Ratty Gourmet, our video team swiped into the Ratty to tackle this week’s subject: the decadent and creative dessert panini.

Image via.


Info Session Thumb

BlogDailyHerald Presents: Brunonia, Episode 5, The Info Session

Everyone loves a good ~explanabrag.

Here’s the fifth episode of BlogDailyHerald’s webseries Brunonia.


VlogReviews: 3C2C

This week, VlogDH peeked into the rehearsals for 3C2C (3 Chairs, 2 Cubes), Brown’s undergraduate playwriting festival. Featuring five student-written and student-directed short plays, 3C2C presents the viewer with a healthy combination of absurd, moving, and hilarious moments that demonstrate the creative passion of all involved. 

To see the festival, swing by Production Workshop (7 Young Orchard Ave.) at any of these times: 

October 24th – 5pm

October 25th – 8pm

October 26th – 8pm

*Runtime is approximately 70 minutes.


protest-7

Students call for renaming of Fall Weekend to Indigenous Peoples’ Day

Today at noon, over 200 demonstrators gathered on the Main Green to stand in solidarity with indigenous people and urge the administration to officially change the name of Fall Weekend to recognize Indigenous Peoples’ Day. Native American students, faculty, and community members wore their people’s traditional regalia and others attending in solidarity wore red and black to commemorate the day. 

The event began with members of Native Americans at Brown (NAB) introducing themselves, speaking in their respective indigenous languages and English, and welcoming the protestors. The organizers of the demonstration, Sierra Edd ’18, Kara Roanhorse ’18 and Phoebe Young ’17, spoke about the purpose of the event and of NAB. Young said Native Americans at Brown exists “first and foremost to provide support for Native students on campus.” The demonstration also included calls to sign a petition asking the administration to rename Fall Weekend to “Indigenous Peoples’ Day.”

Over the course of two hours, demonstrators gave speeches celebrating the resistance and resilience of indigenous people in America and discussing their hopes for the future. The leaders of the demonstration performed the Pequot Flag Song and led the crowd in a round dance before marching and chanting through campus to President Christina Paxson P’19’s house.

protest-5

While the relevance and significance of this demonstration was felt strongly on campus due to the events of last week, the movement for Indigenous Peoples’ Day is occurring nationwide. Edd stated that Native Americans at Brown have been planning this event long before last week, and that she felt the need for more awareness and support from Brown as early as the first day of school. Their intention is that the university will dedicate space and institutional support to native and indigenous people at Brown. In Floripa Olguin ’16‘s words, this in part means “institutionalized recruitment,” particularly of the Wompanoag and Naragansett tribes, as Brown’s campus itself exists within their tribal lines.

NAB’s hope is that the Brown community can use this demonstration as an opportunity for change and historical accountability. Olguin encourages us, as academics, to take on the “learning that is needed for growth, even if it is very different than folks are used to.”

Continue Reading