Sans Meal Plan: Holiday Cookies

For the final Sans Meal Plan of 2015, we are gifting you an easy cookies recipe that doesn’t involve Phoebe Buffet’s grandmother, Nesele Toulouse. Celebrate the official end of finals and the start of the winter break with a round of holiday chocolate crinkle cookies.

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Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cup confectioners’ sugar
  • 1 2/3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 stick butter
  • 1 1/4 cups sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

Preheat the over to 350 degrees and grease two baking sheets with butter. In a medium bowl, stir together the flour, cocoa, baking powder and salt.
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Sans Meal Plan: What to do with your excess apples

Unable to keep up with your market share? Partook in the obligatory fall activity that is taking pictures on a farm apple-picking? Chances are, you have a surplus of Macouns and Galas. Here’s an easy and yummy solution way to put them all to good use: baked apples with oat crumble.

Ingredients:

The apple part…..

  • Apples (duh)
  • 4 tbsp unsalted butter
  • 3 tbsp sugar
  • 2 tbsp brown sugar
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 3/4 cups apple juice

The crumble part….

  • 3/4 cup butter
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 cup whole-wheat flour
  • 2 1/4 cups rolled oats
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 tbsp honey
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar

Preheat your oven to 375 degrees. Peel and cut your apples.

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Toss the apples with the butter, sugar, brown sugar, salt, cinnamon, and apple juice. Place the apples into into a baking dish and cover with foil. Bake the apples for about 40 minutes/until soft.

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While the apples are baking, make the crumble. Combine the butter, cinnamon, vanilla, whole-wheat flour, oats, salt, honey, and brown sugar in a bowl.

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Sans Meal Plan: Grilled cheese egg-in-a-hole

The temperatures have finally dropped, and it’s that point in the semester when everyone’s cooking routine has become increasingly lazy. Thank you, midterms. Here’s what you should make if you’ve found yourself with a near-empty fridge, minimal time, and comfort food cravings.

Ingredients

  • slices soft bread (I used multi-grain but Food52 recommends white or potato)
  • 1 to 2 teaspoons mayonnaise (I subbed the mayo for olive oil)
  • 1 to 2 slices sharp white cheddar cheese 
  • egg

Start heating a non-stick pan on medium-low. Brush a thin layer of olive oil on one slice of bread and place the bread oil-side down in the pan.bread1

Place your slices of cheese on the bread, leaving a cheese-less square in the middle.

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Brush another thin layer of olive oil on the other slice of bread and place it on top of the cheese, oil-side up. Let the cheese get all melt-y a.k.a. until the sandwich is golden brown.

Flip the sandwich over. Using your BlogDailyHerald shot glass, cut out a hole in the middle of the sandwich. Take a shot. 

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Sans Meal Plan: Zesty lemon bars because I’m already sick of pumpkin spice

I know this headline is pretty controversial, but even if you are a PSL-lover and have tried every pumpkin-spice-flavored treat on Thayer, you might find these lemon bars unseasonably refreshing. To make my lemon bars, I ended up settling on a Food52 variation of the ever-classic desert that makes use of ricotta, and when has cheese not made anything infinitely better?

Recipe for lemon ricotta squares:

Crust

  • 1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2/3 cup confectioners’ sugar
  • 1/4 cup cornstarch
  • 1 tablespoon lemon zest
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 12 tablespoons unsalted butter (1 1/2 sticks) 

Filling

  • 8oz (1 cup) fresh whole milk Ricotta 
  • 4 large eggs 
  • 1 1/3cups granulated sugar
  • 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 2 tablespoons lemon zest
  • 2/3 cup lemon juice 
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees, and lightly butter a baking dish and line with one sheet parchment paper. Butter paper, then lay second sheet crosswise over it. I didn’t have parchment paper handy, so I aggressively buttered the pan and hoped for the best. The pan clean-up wasn’t seamless, but nobody complained about the extra butter.

Mix the flour, confectioner’s sugar, cornstarch, lemon zest, salt, and softened butter until it looks dough-y. A food processor is ideal, but I just did it the old-fashioned way. lemonbars1

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Sprinkle the dough into lined pan and, press firmly with fingers into even layer over entire pan bottom and about 1/2-inch up sides. Refrigerate for 30 minutes, and then bake for about 20 minutes until golden brown.

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Students who do cool things: Olivia Pecini RISD ’16 and Maddie Dennis RISD ’17, co-founders of Muse’s Milk

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Meet Olivia Pecini RISD ’16 and Maddie Dennis RISD ’17, co-founders of Muse’s Milk, a website that highlights “women working in various creative fields—to share their origin stories, promote their work, and offer readers advice from the women making the art world spin.” The talented RISD Animation-majors themselves have interviewed a range of professional women from production designers and art directors to writers and fashion photographers. I sat down, BlogDH-interviewer-to-Muse’s-Milk-interviewers (sooo meta), to learn more about the development and growth of the site. Check out the interview below if only to be reminded that our neighbors down the Hill are pretty f*cking cool.

BlogDH: In your own words, what is Muse’s Milk and how did the idea develop?

Olivia: It started back in January when Maddie and I realized that a lot of people at RISD don’t really have female artists as inspiration. Even we realized that in naming our favorite artists, most of them weren’t women.

Maddie: We’re both animation majors and the field is very male-dominated. Essentially, we wanted the site to be a place to celebrate women working in creative fields, whether it’s visual arts or music. It was an opportunity to poke around for interesting women in fields we want to be in.

BlogDH: Is there a story behind the name?

Olivia: Essentially we had no idea what to call it and we were coming up with names for a month, and constant streams of lousy titles. So then I asked my friend who’s an art history major for literally any reference that might be fitting. It was true desperation. She sent me a list, and there was this one that was really bizarre— “the muse’s milk.” Supposedly the breast milk of a muse will give you endless creativity.

Maddie: As soon as you told me about it you said, “this is pretty weird, but what do you think?” And I was like “oh yeah.” (laughs). I think we wanted something that made people question, and having a name like that will at least make people look at our site a little longer. We kind of went from there. It’s not a dramatic story, it just happened!

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BlochDailyHerald: An Interview with Professor Stefano Bloch on this Friday’s Urban Studies Paint-Out event

If you’re unfamiliar with Urban Studies at Brown, you might not have heard of 29 Manning, the adorably quaint two-story house on the walk towards the daunting doors of Barus & Holley that serves as the department’s house. Designed in 1938 by architects and owners Peter J. and Margaret B. Geddes, the building “is a striking example of early Rhode Island modernism,” a contrast to College Hill’s overwhelmingly dominant presence of buildings in Federal, Greek Revival, and Colonial Revival styles. Adding to its incredible historical legacy, 29 Manning once served as the office for Peter J. Geddes and his partner, where the duo designed some of Rhode Island’s best modern buildings.*

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After a 20-year term as the department’s home, the time has come to say goodbye to 29 Manning. To pay homage, Providence artist Gregory Pennisten will produce a full size grafitti-mural on the façade of the building on Friday afternoon. To learn more about how the department is bidding adieu, I sat down with Professor Stefano Bloch, Presidential Diversity Fellow in Urban Studies.

BlogDH: What is your background in relation to graffiti and public murals?

Bloch: I’m interested in graffiti as a phenomenon in terms of how this sub-cultural act contributes to the appearance and functioning of the built urban environment. In my more general interest, I’m always fascinated by the lengths to which people will go to assert themselves in an often-alienating urban environment, even if it means risking their freedom. So transgression and forms of contestation are simply interesting to me on both an intellectual but also personal level.

In my teaching and research, I focus on graffiti like I would focus on any other prolific, visual, and contestative act that contributes to our collective life-worlds. So graffiti to me in that way is not unique at all as well as being so unique in terms of how visually prolific it is. That’s actually the main point – that it is both unique and not unique. It’s not unique in that it’s one of the many components to the development of our life-worlds, our cultural spaces, but it is unique in that it’s so visually present in our lives. While at the same time being, to put it simply, often illegal. In this case it is not illegal.

Professors and their cars...

Professors and their cars…

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