Turkey Drop 101

Walking Thanksgiving Turkey. Isolated on a white background.

Last week, college first-years nationwide returned home for Thanksgiving to reunite with family, spend time with old friends, and, in many cases, dump their high-school sweethearts. This phenomenon is often called the “Turkey Drop” (“dumpsgiving” or “Turkey Dump” work as well) and refers to students using that week back in their old stomping grounds to end long-distance relationships. This is especially the case for first-years, who came into college determined to stay true and loyal to the person they thought was their “one and only.” It’s a big commitment to try to keep a relationship going after two people go off to different schools, but what’s with the sudden end?

First of all, going home for the first time since leaving for college can be super weird. The place that was once more familiar than anything else in the world suddenly feels distant and small. Your universe has become full of new people, ideas, and desires, and with this often comes the need for change, which may mean ending a relationship that ties you to home.

For many people, the timing also just makes sense. A few weeks before the holiday season is one of the year’s peak break-up times because breaking up with someone during one of the most festive and magical times of the year just feels wrong. And if the Drop doesn’t happen over Thanksgiving, the dumper will realistically have to wait until The Spring Clean to break it off with peace of mind.

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Know your Lecture Board candidates: Viola Davis

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One of Brown’s possible Lecture Board speakers for Spring 2016 is Viola Davis, and if you don’t know who she is, where have you been? Have you seen her daughter’s amazing Viola Davis Halloween costume?

Davis is an American Actress known for her starring roles in The Help and Shonda Rhimes’ hit show How to Get Away with Murder. She’s accumulated quite a few awards over the years: she won a Tony award for Best Featured Actress in a Play for her role as Tonya in King Hedley II and for Best Actress in a Play for Fences, along with an Oscar nomination for Best Actress for her performance as Aibileen Clark in The Help and a nod for Best Supporting Actress for her role in 2008’s Doubt. 

Most notably, she was the first African American woman to receive an Emmy award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama series, which she won for her role in How to Get Away with Murder. She has spoken out about the opportunities for women of color in the media, and her Emmy win has come to symbolize a  significant moment for diversity in Hollywood. In 2012, Time named her one of their 100 Most Influential People.

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BlogDH Panel: Memorable Uber experiences

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At some point or another, we all rely on a beautiful little app called Uber to get around. It keeps us warm in the cold, safe in the dark, and ridin’ in style (most of the time). Uber drivers do a lot more than just take us from place to place, however. They often share their stories, give us much-needed advice on life and love, and add a little excitement to our otherwise mundane lives.

This past Halloweekend, my friend and I were bemoaning a certain boy’s failure to notice our presence, as one does in late-night Uber rides, and we were convinced all hope was lost. And yet, after a few minutes of despair, our driver turned around to us and said, “He’s not worth it. You guys are too young to be worried about things like that.” My friend and I turned to each other and realized how spot-on his words were. We then proceeded to throw the thought of this guy out the window and lived our lives like the free youths we were supposed to be.

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After this enlightening experience, I decided to turn to my fellow members of BlogDH, and see if they had any Uber stories of their own to share. Here’s what they said:

“I had an Uber driver try to convince me that Andrew Jackson wasn’t the seventh president of the United States.” — Anthony DeRita

“My Uber driver this weekend overheard us talking about guys and was like, ‘Height isn’t that important…it’s all about their heart’ and then she [said,] ‘and more importantly, you can’t tell when they are lying down’ and she was like 45. She rocked.” — Allison Gordon

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A scaredy cat’s guide to Halloween

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Halloween is one of the few times of year that it’s socially acceptable to do whatever you can to scare the crap out of people. Whether it’s a simple sneak-up from behind or an elaborately planned prank, it’s prime time for spooking. For the same reason people voluntarily put their bodies on metal scaffolding hundreds of feet in the air and ride around for the “thrill,” some love the rush of adrenaline that can only come when scared out of their minds. But some rational-thinkers, myself included, prefer to live our lives calmly and without weird masks popping out at us and eerie sounds emanating from unknown locations. If you find yourself in this category, rest assured, it doesn’t mean we can’t enjoy this Hallow’s Eve!

First of all, there are plenty of people out there who are in the same boat as you, so, if you can, try to find a group that won’t be actively seeking out scary stuff and stick with them. This will allow you to relax and have fun, while avoiding those awkward conversations about how you’d rather cut off your left leg than enter a haunted house. Even within a larger group, finding just one fear-phobic person to hang back with will make you feel infinitely better.

Don’t let the FOMO get to you, though. Forcing yourself to go somewhere where you know you’ll be miserable just so you can show up in Facebook photos is probably a bad idea. Plus, you’ll likely end up looking pale and terrified in all those pictures, anyway. Staying in is well worth safeguarding your mental stability.

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Six types of posts you see on Brown Bears Admirers

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Let’s be honest: everyone secretly (or not so secretly) dreams that sometime before they graduate, they’ll have at least one Brown Bears Admirers post written about them. And not one of those fake, submitted-by-a-friend-who-thinks-they’re-being-hilarious type of posts. A real, legitimate post by a secret admirer. Who wouldn’t want to know that someone out there is hopelessly pining for them?

Within the Admirers page, however, there are many different types of posts, ranging from full-blown love letters to a lighthearted nod to that cute guy in your math class. Here are six different types of posts you might see on Brown Bears Admirers:

 

1. The actual crush

The writers of these posts are the real MVPs. They’re willing to put it all out there, letting their crushes know there’s someone who’s really interested in them. These posts are rare, but when they do appear, they’re truly a sight to behold. Likely featuring phrases like “meant for each other” and “a real connection from the moment we met,” these will probably make you roll your eyes, but you’ll still feel that pang of jealousy deep down in your eternally single heart.

 

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Don’t let those crushes stay secret forever!

2. The “I don’t know you, but you’re super hot”

Much more common than posts that praise people for their wonderful souls and strength of character, these are about what’s on the outside. Sometimes you just have to let a person know when they’ve got it goin’ on. These posts can vary from sweet and kind (“you are unspeakably beautiful”) to, let’s just say more crudely put (“literally fuck me”).

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Frosh-cessities: How to stay in touch with friends from home

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You’re a month into college already (it’s crazy, I know), and as everything (sort of) begins to calm down, you finally have the chance to catch up with your friends from home about all the crazy things you’ve done, people you’ve met, classes you’ve taken, hookups you’ve regretted, and so on. But suddenly, you sit down to talk, and you don’t know where to begin. So much has happened, and you almost don’t want to say anything. For the first time, your BFF doesn’t know who you’re talking about when you say “that guy down the hall with the weird laugh.” You’re starting to come to the realization that you live in distinct and separate worlds, and talking to people who don’t experience your little bubble every day can be hard. But don’t worry! Here are some steps you can take to make it a little bit easier to stay in touch with close friends from home:

1. Have shorter conversations more often. It might seem like a good idea to set up times once a week, or however often, when you can talk for hours about every single thing that’s happened to you. But that can be pretty exhausting and tough to maintain. Instead, try squeezing in shorter conversations, even if they’re only ten minutes, more often. The little details will start adding up so that you have a better sense of each other’s lives, and vice versa. When you have friend drama or ~love~ troubles, your friends will likely already know the people you’re talking about and be ready to jump in with quality advice.

2. Make time for your friends from home. These first few weeks, you’ve probably felt so overwhelmed that you barely have time to eat, let alone stop everything to FaceTime your friends. There’s always something you could or should be doing. Most often, however, you either have the time or are capable of making the time if you really want to. You would probably spend that half hour procrastinating, anyway, so stop with the excuses!

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