Brown community continues to show solidarity with Ferguson and New York

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In the weeks since the non-indictments of the police officers who killed Michael Brown and Eric Garner, we have seen all kinds of protests against a justice system that is rarely applied equally to all Americans. In Providence alone, there have been die-ins, marches, and a massive petition to Senator Sheldon Whitehouse demanding reform.

Though finals period often takes our attention away from just about everything outside of our looming exams, many members of the Brown community have continued to stand up and demand a more equitable justice system–one in which black lives matter. You can see as much on your news feed every day: our classmates are traveling to New York to join the Millions March, sharing posts about how best to be an ally at a time like this, and expressing their rage and sorrow at the events of the past month. Some have led their own protests, lending a hand in the best way they know how.

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Students Who Do Cool Things: Jared Rothenberg ’15 and Ivy Sokol ’15, founders of Moving Mountains

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We often take our time in nature for granted. Some of us may have gone to summer camps that taught us how to kayak or build a campfire; others may have lived just minutes away from a beautiful national park. Experiences like these, or even an outdoor activity as simple as a run up Blackstone Boulevard, are out of the reach of many children who grow up in Providence. Jared Rothenberg ’15 and Ivy Sokol ’15 have partnered in order to provide a greater level of access to the outdoors and, in doing so, are joining a growing outdoor education movement. Their new organization is called Moving Mountains.

In their words, Moving Mountains is “an environmental education program for high school students in Providence,” but it can be so much more. The website for the organization lays out a persuasive case for the value of outdoor education programs like this. Not only do they “empower participants to achieve academically, embrace civic engagement, and practice lifelong environmental stewardship,” but they also provide physiological benefits that range from lower blood pressure to improved mental health.

For Sokol, the setting of outdoor education is essential to improving outcomes for kids: “the wilderness is sort of a simplified classroom in which behaviors can be enforced really easily.” Outside the walls of a typical high school, students can “become more self-aware” while — as Rothenberg later added — still thinking about “their local environments, whether that’s local parks or local issues… that might influence their lack of access” to the outdoors. In this way, Moving Mountains’ programming promotes both “leadership development” and “a sense of environmental stewardship.”

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Blue Room sandwich sauces and spreads, (completely unscientifically) ranked

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Because we at BlogDailyHerald like to watch and pick petty fights on the Internet, we’re borrowing a most excellent series from Gawker Media’s Deadspin. The site has ranked everything from light beers to every age 40 and under, with little to no comment attached. The goal? Not just to give an unearned platform to one author’s totally not authoritative personal opinion, but also to start a conversation. This ranking may be (completely) unscientific, even “useless,” but together I know we can put together a definitive list. Comment with your staunch support or vehement disagreement!

13. Spicy Brown Mustard. It must suck to win the bronze… among the mustards.

12. Chevre Spread. What the fuck is a Chevre?

11. Yellow Mustard. Sure, it’s a classic, but why not live a little?

10. Fat Free Italian. I’m not sure what chemicals had to go into this dressing to make it fat free, but I’m into it.

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#AYOTZINAPA comes to Brown with teach-in, exhibit

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Did you see these 43 empty chairs set up on the Main Green today? Did you walk by them without figuring out what they were for? It’s fine, you probably aren’t alone in that. But these chairs, an exhibit titled “We are the 43 still missing,” were there as an homage to the 43 students at a Mexican teachers college that disappeared this September after an encounter with local police. The students were on their way to a protest when they were arrested — after a gunfight in which 10 other students died — handed over to a cartel called the United Warriors, and presumably murdered. Each chair on the Main Green today had a portrait of one of the missing students on it. Their disappearance has sparked outrage both in Mexico and around the world.

Last night, the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies hosted a teach-in on the tragedy in Iguala, the town in which the Normal University of Ayotzinapa is located. The Center’s director, Richard Snyder, moderated the panel, which consisted of four women: Janice Gallagher, Paula Martínez  ’17, Atenea Rosado-Viurques, and Camila Ruiz ’18.

Before any of the panelists spoke to a packed Kassar Foxboro auditorium, however, Snyder showed a 5 minute video titled “Mexico: The Wound of the World” to provide some context. Since the beginning of the use of the military against drug cartels in 2006, levels of violence have exploded. The country’s poorest states, including Guerrero, where these students were from, have faced disproportionate amounts this violence.

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PollerBears: Oh the weather outside is frightful…

#winterwonderland… Providence version.

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It’s November, which means a seemingly endless onslaught of heavy precipitation at temperatures just above freezing has begun. In the past few days, I’ve heard a myriad of terms used for the absolutely awful weather that most recently visited us on Monday.

So what is it? A wintry mix? Sleet? The Worst Thing? Let us know. In the meantime, we at BlogDH just wish it would snow already. Time to move to Buffalo.

What do you call that really unpleasant semi-solid precipitation we get so often?

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10 things you missed if you didn’t attend Rock at the Rock

It’s official: Brown absolutely loves birthdays. This weekend, the Rock celebrated the big 5-0, and instead of a typical 50th birthday party with fancy wine and adults making small talk, the library threw perhaps the punniest party in the Brown’s history. Here are ten things you missed if you didn’t rock out at Rock at the Rock:

10.  Food from the Ratty, after 7:30 p.m.: Rock at the Rock was a catered event, complete with soda, hot chocolate, and the full hummus bar straight out of the Ratty’s Roots and Shoots section.

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9.  A chance to say thanks to the librarians: Almost the entire library staff was at the festivity. Since they are the secret superheroes of Brown — and are in the midst of important contract negotiations with the University — they deserve some serious appreciation. You could always chat them a nice note.

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8. Cupcakes that looked like rocks: Rocks aren’t necessarily the most appetizing-looking minerals, but cupcakes are always a plus.

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