A ranking of study spots based on how much work you actually need to do

Choosing a study spot is something of an art form. It requires serious consideration of the task at hand. There are days when not getting your work done is simply not an option. And then there are the (glorious) days when you have some reading you probably should do but you’re more than ready to leave it behind the moment something mildly exciting comes your way. So, for people on all parts of the study spectrum, here’s a ranking from “if you talk to me I’ll probably kill you” to “I will literally use any excuse to stop doing my work.”


  1. John Hay Library



The Hay is the place to go when you simply need to zero in, get in the zone, and just get down to business. You pretty much have no other option than to be alone with your thoughts. The sheer weight of the silence will physically force your fingers to type that paper you’ve been dreading. You will feel shame for scrolling through your Facebook feed for the fifteenth time, and although everyone else is deep inside their studious worlds, they will know that you are procrastinating, and they might judge you.


  1. The SciLi


This is where you go when you need to burn the midnight oil, since the Hay closes at 10 p.m. and, let’s be real, you’re lucky if your book is open by 10. On the SciLi’s quiet floor, there is actually nothing to distract you. In fact, you will probably want to do your work in order to get out of that concrete dungeon as fast as possible. If that’s not enough, the tangible stress floating through the air should do the trick.

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Puppy playtime, all the time

You might not be an animal person, but there comes a point in the semester when the work actually gets hard and the novelty is gone and you just need unconditional love. Since Heavy Petting can only happen so often, and you have to divide the puppy love among hundreds of students, it’s time to take matters into your own hands. Instead of FaceTime-ing your cat (which is apparently a thing?), take a look around campus–there are a number of places right outside your dorm where you can get some prime animal action.


This could be you!!

Main Green. For reasons I will never understand due to the high probability of being flocked by students, a number of people walk their dogs across the Main Green daily. This can happen at any time of day, but the chunk of time between 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. typically sees the highest concentration of dogs.

Pro: It’s the easiest place on campus to set up shop and even the laziest of students are bound to see a dog at some point.

Con: You’ll probably have to share your dog time with the hoards of other students dying for affection as well. Continue Reading

Sextion: Froshies in the friendzone


Hey, Brunonia! This is Demisexual Lovato, your new Sextion writer. If you are puzzled or confused by my pseudonym, allow me to explain: demisexuals are folks who don’t feel sexually attracted to other people unless they’ve gotten to know them on an emotional or romantic level. Essentially– I’m all about the feels. But have no fear! I’ll still be talking about hooking up, romance, and everything in between during my tenure as Blog’s Sextion columnist.

It’s September 5th, 2015. 1,600-ish nervous freshmen (including me!) are moving into their dorms.

Many are looking for love and almost all are looking for friendship. Somewhere between these two goals lies the issue: the friendzone. At a time when most of us are rushing to make friends and meet as many new people as possible, it’s so easy in this chaos to mistake kindness for romantic interest or to brush off someone’s subtle flirtations as, “Oh, they are just a really nice person.” Whether you are looking for close friendship, a serious relationship, a friend with benefits, casual dating, random hookups, a study buddy, a crazed sex monster, or nothing at all along the lines of human attachment, you have probably already experienced the feelings of uncertainty and confusion that accompany this new and foreign territory.

The most perplexing person you’ve met thus far is your new (and, might I add, devilishly attractive) best friend in whom you can’t help but find yourself interested. Do they like you back? Are you willing to risk your amazing new friendship to find out?

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Student Group Spotlight: emPOWER, the Brown Concert for Climate Action, and RYSE


This Friday, emPower, Brown’s umbrella environmental organization, will be hosting the Brown Concert for Climate Action to raise awareness about climate change and its consequences. emPOWER has teamed up with Know Tomorrow, a national campaign partnering with over 50 colleges across the country and started by Brown alum Wendy Abrams ’87. The concert will feature activist Kerry Kennedy ’81 P’17, the beloved What Cheer? Brigade, Voces Verdes- Latino Leadership, Young Hummus, Sons of ProvidenceSebastián ()tero ’18, a video message from Senator Sheldon Whitehouse, and more!

On Saturday, emPOWER will be hosting the Rhode Island Youth Summit on the Environment (RYSE) which will bring high school and college students from across Rhode Island together to foster debate around the current state of the environmental movement and according to the RYSE Facebook event description “challenge our common perceptions of environmental issues.” The RYSE keynote speech will be delivered by Voces Verdes- Latino Leadership in Action. You can also check out a comprehensive list of Saturday’s RYSE events and register here.

Blog connected with emPOWER’s Executive Director Camila Bustos ’16 to learn more about these two events.

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Blogify: In the Groove (Part II)


Now that Shopping Period’s (finally) officially over, things are starting to fall into place. As one fellow Blogify-er once said, you’re probably starting to feel “in the groove.” So, in that spirit, here’s a playlist in honor of getting back into the swing of things, featuring plenty of classic throwbacks, new jams, and–of course–Beyoncé.

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Alums Who Do Cool Things: Ben Lerner ’01 wins MacArthur grant

Photo courtesy of Matt Lerner.The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation fellowships are often called “genius grants,” because the selected fellows get $625,000 with what the Foundation itself calls “no-strings attached.”

There is no application; an anonymous committee makes the decision to select individuals who have shown “extraordinary originality and dedication in their creative pursuits.” Those individuals then receive over half a million dollars to just keep doing what they’re doing.

This year, the 24 fellows include a puppeteer, a history professor, a chemist, and Brown alum, Ben Lerner. Lerner graduated Brown with a B.A. in Political Science in 2001, and remained at Brown to attain a M.F.A in creative writing. He is no stranger to prestigious awards (Fulbright, Guggenheim Fellow) or high critical praise.

Lerner is the author of three collections of poetry and two novels. If you haven’t read it already, Leaving the Atocha Station is definitely worth picking up. The novel follows narrator Adam Gordon through a year in Spain, where, having won a prestigious fellowship, he mostly just attempts to keep up the appearance of doing something.

Lerner also works as a professor at Brooklyn College, though he told the New York Times that he can now hopefully spend less time teaching and more time writing. Regarding the grant, Lerner said, ““It takes away all your excuses to not be doing the most ambitious work.”

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