What to do this week: November 23 – 26


While a lot of students reading this are already home, here are some on-campus goings-on for those of us pushing through til Wednesday at noon.

Monday, November 23

Event: Grading the Green
Location: Main Green
Time: 10:00 a.m. — 4:00 p.m.

“As a part of the class Pathology to Power, a group of Brown students have turned the tables on this University and graded some of the most important spaces for students on campus. These buildings were graded with various types of accessibility in mind to be more inclusive of our community.”

Event: Applied Music Voice Masterclass
Location: Grant Recital Hall
Time: 4:00 p.m.

Is singing “Happy Birthday” a struggle? Have you always been secretly envious of Ariana Grande? If you answered yes to either of these questions, or are just interested in improving your singing voice, join Dr. Brad Fugate in a musical masterclass. This event is free, open to the public, and not nearly as intimidating as a having doctorate in vocal performance would lead you to believe it is.

Event: jSwipe Live
Location: Petteruti Lounge
Time: 8:00 p.m. — 10:00 p.m.

Happy Cuffing Season! Find a “jBae” to text over the break. All are welcome and “aphrodisiacs will be served.”

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Listen Up: A Cappella Mafia

Hear ye, hear ye! We at Blog present to you Listen Up, a bi-weekly Blogcast that will be bringing you the most sensational news from Brunonia. This week, we bring you an in-depth look into the inner working of Brown’s a cappella scene.

Make sure to follow us on SoundCloud and download each episode for on-the-go listening!

The episode was written by Ari Snider ’18, Allie Tsuchiya ’18, and Ilan Desai-Geller ’18. It was produced by Ari Snider. 

Music: “Jackbird” by Bluedot Sessions, “Burning Van” by Big Mean Sound Machine, and “Lumitatae Gaels Revenge” by Underscore Orkestra

Image via Albert Brown ’16. 

Know your Lecture Board candidates: Edward Snowden

Edward_Snowden-2A former CIA agent and NSA whistleblower, Edward Snowden remains a figure who – over two years since his deliberate leaking of classified NSA and GCHQ documents – requires little introduction.

One of the most controversial figures in the world, Snowden rose to prominence in 2013 when journalist Glenn Greenwald and others published thousands of US government documents acknowledging the existence of widespread telecommunications surveillance programs extending not merely across the US, but in European countries and elsewhere. Greenwald later admitted that it had been an NSA contractor, working at the organization’s regional operations center in Hawaii, who had provided him with the documents.

Born into a family with a long history of service in the federal government (his grandfather was a rear admiral in the Navy), Edward Snowden is currently wanted by US authorities for theft of US government property and two counts of violating the Espionage Act.

Despite his ongoing process of seeking asylum in a number of Latin American countries, Snowden’s current inability to travel beyond the borders of his current haven of Russia will necessitate a Skype conversation in lieu of a physical presence if he is chosen as the speaker for next semester. Regardless of the measures necessary, however, Snowden should prove an extremely interesting and relevant candidate in today’s era of global surveillance and privacy concerns.

Don’t forget to vote for Snowden or for the other Lecture Board speaker candidates here!

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BlogDH goes to Asian Cafe


Like many Brown students, we were bummed to say goodbye to Spats– a go-to bar and hangout spot on Angell street. Needless to say, when Asian Cafe announced its opening, we knew we had to try it. We sent five of our most adventurous writers to give Asian Cafe a try in the name of journalism.

For your reading pleasure, we’ve compiled a number of our thoughts to give you an insight into the holistic Asian Cafe experience.

Initial impressions:

  • “I was skeptical about the cost efficiency of all you can eat for $20. Would I really eat more than twenty bucks worth of sushi, tempura, etc. in one sit down, with no take-home allowed? Potentially, if I were trashed, and hadn’t gorged myself with Annie’s Mac and Cheese a few hours earlier. Nonetheless, I threw my fucks to the wind, and ordered a couple of pieces of raw sushi, seaweed salad, sweet potato tempura, and ice cream (duh). I considered consolidating all of the tables orders onto one of those Mad-Libs esque menu sheets (what is an adverb that also tastes like spicy yellowtail?), but I figured, ‘nah, the restaurant’s got this.’”
  • “Spats was an important place for me on campus — not because I ever went there, besides the time that I was kicked out for ‘disorderly conduct,’ but because my Dad had decided upon my move-in to Brown that Spats was where it was at. Every time we talked on the phone he’d ask ‘so how’s my fave place Spats with the 20 oz. beers?’ Needless to say, I felt an obligation to welcome the new restaurant on the block.”
  • “There were around twenty to thirty people already in the establishment, which was encouraging. No one seemed too upset…yet.”
  • “I miss Spats.”

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Know your Lecture Board candidates: Toni Morrison

Toni Morrison

A quick bio:

Toni Morrison is an American novelist best known for writing The Bluest Eye, Song of Solomon, and Beloved. Her novels, centering around vivid characters, questions of identity, and the legacy of slavery, are considered among the best fiction ever written. In 1988, she won a Pulitzer prize and was nominated for the American Book Award for Beloved, and in 1993 she won the Nobel Prize in Literature. Her latest work, God Help the Child, was released in early 2015.

What we want to know more about:

  1. Her life before she was an acclaimed author. Before Morrison published her first book at age 39, she worked as a senior trade-book editor at Random House publishing and played a critical role in bringing Black literature into the mainstream during the 60s and 70s. During this time, she met Henry Dumas, Angela Davis, Huey P. Newton, Toni Cade Bambara and Gayl Jones and edited Mohammed Ali’s autobiography.
  2. Her relationships with feminism and intersectionality. Although her novels often surround Black female characters, Morrison doesn’t consider them to be feminist. When asked “Why distance oneself from feminism?” in 1998, she replied: “In order to be as free as I possibly can, in my own imagination, I can’t take positions that are closed. Everything I’ve ever done, in the writing world, has been to expand articulation, rather than to close it, to open doors, sometimes, not even closing the book – leaving the endings open for reinterpretation, revisitation, a little ambiguity.”
  3. Her thoughts on recent nation-wide movements on college campuses. Morrison was a university professor during the Civil Rights era. She has met many leaders who fought and continue to fight for equality, and has devoted her whole life to speaking about the Black experience in America. In a 1976 New York Times essay, she expressed concerns over a waning Civil Rights struggle: “Having been eliminated from the lists of urgent national priorities, from TV documentaries and the platitudes of editorials, black people have chosen, or been forced to seek, safety from the white man’s promise.” Later in the same piece, she says: “In the shambles of closing admissions, falling quotas, widening salary gaps and merging black-studies departments, builders and healers are quietly working among us.” Given these thoughts and experiences, it would be valuable to hear what she has to say about campus movements today.

Why you should vote for Toni Morrison:
Even if you don’t know much about Morrison, there are many reasons to want to hear her speak. We have the benefit of being alive at the same time as one of the most influential novelists in recent history; she is, after all, the only living American winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature. It’s likely that Toni Morrison’s epics could be as fundamental to the American literary canon as Melville’s Moby Dick. To close, Rachel Kaadzi Ghansah of the New York Times sums up what makes Morrison, Morrison:

“Often, in black literature, it seems as though the author is performing two roles: that of the explorer and the explainer. Morrison does not do this. Morrison writes stories that are more aesthetic than overtly political, better expressed in accurate Tolstoyan detail than in generalizing sentiments blunted with anger. Most important, she is an author who writes to tease and complicate her world, not to convince others it is valid.”

In short, Morrison is the one of the world’s most badass authors. She is wise, says what’s on her mind, and—considering events on our campus and across the country—is extremely relevant. Don’t forget to cast your vote here by November 29th!

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Sextion: Vagina crash course


Hey y’all, it’s me, Cer Vix-a-lot. I’m taking over for Demisexual Lovato this week and I’m here to try to give y’all a crash course on female anatomy. As I’m sure a lot of you know, the sex education system in this nation is f***ed up, and a lot of people just have no idea what the hell is going on downstairs. My goal is to create a Ned’s Declassified School Survival Guide to the Vagina. Let’s get started.

*Disclaimer: I’ll be throwing around words like “female” and “girl” a lot in this, but all this anatomy may not apply to transgender, intersex, or non-binary people. Remember: not all women have vaginas, and not all vaginas belong to women.*

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