Frosh-cessities: Pulling an all-nighter

As the all-nighter delirium sets in, your Louis eggs may turn into bear heads.

As the all-nighter delirium sets in, your Louis eggs may turn into bear heads.

A few weeks ago, I did the SciLi challenge. No, not that SciLi challenge—think of this as the nighttime, SciLi version of the Ratty challenge. I spent all night in the SciLi, and capped it off with a little Louis. Like the Ratty challenge, my all-nighter consisted of food, some work, more food, and a hallucination or two.

For some, the all-nighter is a routine experience the night before that weekly problem set is due; for others, it’s only done on weekend nights when partying til the a.m. I had never pulled a real all-nighter before, so for the sake of journalism (and the fact that I had to finish two problem sets by the next morning), I did the new SciLi challenge and recorded my experiences gradual descent into delirium.

9:00 p.m. Guys, I think we can finish this problem set before midnight!

Spoiler alert: This did not happen.
Problems completed: 0/6

9:28 p.m. What the fuck is this shit? Physics? Ain’t nobody got time for that.

10:00 p.m. “Sorry y’all, we have this room reserved.” Really? You actually have the nerve to—okay fine, whatever. We move to another SciLi study room.

11:00 p.m. “Hey guys, sorry but we have this room—” Reserved, yeah, we get it, alright? We move to a third study room.

11:44 p.m. I GOT ONE! I GOT A PROBLEM GUYS!

Problems completed: 1/6

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Your brain on finals

Feeling overwhelmed by work? Need a pick-me-up? Don’t drink one of those disgusting 5- Hour Energy drinks, binge-eat Twinkies, or cry out in sorrow. Instead, calmly read this interview with Fiery Cushman — one Brown’s fantastic professors of Psychology — and learn about what you can do/are doing for your noggin in the coming weeks.Sarah Weiss: Does what I eat have an affect on my brain’s ability to study?

Professor Fiery Cushman: Actually it does.  The brain consumes a large proportion of the body’s energy, and several studies indicate that our investment in careful, effortful thought depends in part on the amount of available sugar in our blood.  When your blood is full of energy you work harder and longer on difficult problems, and are also better at exerting willpower and control over your behavior.But this doesn’t mean that your studying should be fueled by a steady stream of soda and twinkies.  That will buy you a short-term jump in blood sugar, but a long-term crash.  A smarter strategy is to fuel yourself for studying the way you would for a hike: using snacks like trail mix that provide a steady stream of fuel over a long period of time.