The Fall of Fall

If you’re anything like me, you’re trying to hold on to these last days of autumn. You find yourself Snapchatting trees that stop you in your tracks, or picking leaves up off of the sidewalk to press into your journal. Your walks have gotten longer as your fingers have gotten colder and your sneakers are always crunching through the fallen heroes of the season.

What’s that? That’s just me? You, like, actually do your homework?

Visit the library?

Interesting.

Okay, well you’ll be feeling this autumnal nostalgia soon enough when the temperature drops below zero and the world is colorless and bleak. While most of the leaves have lost their luster, some remain.

To capture these the last of this season, I got out my angstiest camera lens and went for a nice little wander throughout campus ~a le flâneur. Fortunately, the sky was especially dismal for me to capture this deeply poetic season for your sadboi viewing pleasure (read: my self-gratification). I encourage you to track down each of these trees and sit under them for a while until you encounter some deep enlightenment or freeze to death — whichever comes first.

Without further ado or anymore obnoxious clichés, I present to you mediocre photos of trees:

These pure #nofilter trees truly capture the beauty of Ruth Simmons. Sit under them while wearing a scarf and reading Dostoyevski, and Brown’s camera guy will definitely put you in a brochure.

Continue Reading


WHY THE F@CK IS IT COLD AND SUNNY

I understand that the title may have betrayed a few aspects of my identity— yes, I’m from Florida; yes, I was born in California; yes, I’m obnoxious. But I resent that Providence’s temperature has been turned into a disgusting display of identity politics. I’m tired of my Northern brethren sneering at my plight— only after I tell them from where I hail. Northern or southern, rural Montana mountaineer or Bay area bro— are we not all human? Do we not all bleed red when cut? Do we not all have functioning nervous systems capable of recognizing how cruel the Providence wind can be?

Look, don’t get the wrong idea. I’m not one of those southerners, I did my research. I didn’t show up to Brown with a single pair of sandals in hand and a few pastel colored shorts, naively expecting the Northeast to cater to me. No, I perused Winter Coat Weekly for months before deciding on my perfect synthetic feather-filled friend. I weathered the jeers of my friends as I asked them innocent questions like “Why can’t I just wear my jean jacket?” I did my due diligence, all in the efforts to keep myself toasty in the icy winter months.

Continue Reading


Holiday food, globally defined

 

a7e9ac75163e69ad09472697193e3599

                Thanksgiving in a nutshell

Thanksgiving for a number of college students was a chance to have a bit of familial comfort and a respite from the Ratty/Vdub experiences to instead indulge in pumpkin pie, apple pie, stuffing, mashed potatoes, and everything autumnal and awesome. But of course, not everyone at Brown celebrated Thanksgiving or ate Thanksgiving food; BlogDailyHerald went straight to the source and asked a few international students to share their own favorite holiday foods. We posed a survey to the international community at Brown and here are some of the answers we got:

For those looking to mix up the obscene amount of chocolate eaten during the holiday season (hello, winter break ’15), José Soria ’19 of Madrid, Spain,  has your alternative. Jose loves turrón, which he describes simply as “super Spanish.” Turrón is essentially a blank canvas for your sweet tooth dreams. Any variation of a block of egg whites, sugar, and honey is considered turrón, and add-ins typically include nuts and chocolate. (Side note: when I lived in Spain my host family had a basket of turrón on the table for three months surrounding Christmas and it was beautiful.)

turrones

For Ian Cheung ’16, of Hong Kong, his favorite holiday food is tang yuan, which is “composed of these little balls of glutinous rice filled with black sesame, in a kind of soup broth.” In addition to being delicious, tang yuan has sentimental value for Ian because “‘it’s a very non-Western sweet food that symbolizes family union,” and reminds him of visiting relatives and family gatherings in Taiwan when he was a kid. It also has the added bonus of being hilarious to eat, because according to Ian, tang yuan is super chewy and often leaves lots of black sesame seeds between your teeth.

 

 

tangyuan

    Does that not look ridiculously fun to eat?

Continue Reading


Blogify: First Day of Fall

35317-Charlie-Brown-Autumn-Gif

Shopping period is ending and the temperature is cruising in the low 70s which can only mean one thing: it’s officially fall. Time to pull out your favorite layers and get to stepping on some crunchy leaves. Here’s a playlist of all your favorite fall-related songs and other jams to get you ready for Providence’s moodiest season.

Image via.