BBA: Behind Blueno’s Admins, EXCLUSIVE Interview

       This Sunday, I had the distinct honor of interviewing some of Brown’s most renowned: the Moderators of the Blueno Bears Admirers page. To maintain their anonymity, their names will not be mentioned during the course of the interview transcript. They will be referred to as Moderators 1 and 2 (numbers assigned by alphabetical order.)

This interview has been edited for clarity.

 

Why keep your identities a secret?

Moderator 2: To maintain the mystique of Blueno. We didn’t invent Blueno, and it’s not our symbol to define; we want people to have their own ideas of what Blueno means to them. It’s also easier to pour your heart out to a lovable, loving teddy bear instead of being self-conscious about the admins who run the page. And it’s harder to send us personalized hate mail when you don’t know who we are.

Moderator 1: On BBA, every post is anonymous, so to keep in style, we should be anonymous, too. We want to be cognizant that people of different backgrounds and identities can project themselves onto Blueno, and we don’t want to stand in front of that. We don’t want the dynamic to be swayed or changed by their perception of the people fronting everything, so we think we’ll stay behind the bear for now.

 

What made you decide to start Blueno?

Moderator 1: Because we’re a bunch of narcissists! Just kidding, there are other reasons, too. Our predecessor Brown Bears Admirers was like a little bit of magic on campus. It made people really happy. It was an important part of campus culture. There’s definitely still a need for that kind of a platform on campus. I had never received a BBA post about me, and I really wanted one, so I was like, hey guys, let’s make a platform for this.

Moderator 2: I really missed BBA after it disappeared in August. I find other online communities at Brown so interesting. They don’t just exist in isolation; people talk about them, and they shape the discourse on campus. They’re just Facebook pages, sure, but they can also legitimately affect people’s lives in a very tangible way. And of course, they’re always making people’s days a little brighter.

 

How did you start Blueno, and what was the process like?

Moderator 1: We’d been toying with the idea for a while. When Brown Bears Admirers disappeared, everyone on campus was like, “Where’d they go?” Including me. I wanted admiration posts. So, I started prototyping how people would submit things, the moderation process, all that. I ended up following the same tried-and-true Brown Bears Admirers model, primarily built on Google Forms, with a bunch of extra formulas and automation built into Google Sheets. I finished developing it around August, and our first post was on September 9 by (Moderator 2).

Moderator 2: I thought that was you!?

Moderator 1: No, I’m sure it was you.

Moderator 2: I remember the Blueno the Bear page already existed for years; you (Moderator 1) reached out to whoever ran it.

Moderator 1: Yeah, it was owned by a Brown student who graduated a few years ago. I decided to build the secret admirers page from the perspective of Blueno because I thought it would be cool. The Brown alum was down. I pulled the original BBA icon into Illustrator and Photoshop to make it look like Blueno, sort of a visual parody of the original, to communicate that we’re building from the original spirit of BBA.

 

What about the name?

Moderator 2: The page was initially just Blueno the Bear. But people referred to it as BBA, because it was easier and people knew that it meant the admirers page. So we changed the name to Blueno Bears Admirers.

 

What are some issues you face as moderators? What do you do with  controversial content? Do you ever receive any?

Moderator 1: We get controversial content every day. We have like hundreds, thousands of submissions, but we read and discuss every single one amongst the board of 8 undergraduate students. We spend so much time discussing and editorializing what we should post, and what we shouldn’t. The group chat is always rife with debate. Is this post being sex positive, or is it making an individual uncomfortable? Is this post celebrating an identity, or demeaning it?

Moderator 2: The point is, there’s a ton of social factors in play with everything we post—how does this post affect members of the community? If we censor it, how does that affect people with this identity?

Moderator 1: There’s this fascinating phenomenon where people dissociated from their own names and responsibilities suddenly talk about ethical matters they wouldn’t say out loud. For example, we had that recent controversy with TAs and RPLs “admiring” their students. A lot of people presume that it’s completely acceptable to be attracted to their students and post about it. This is ethically wrong, a potential abuse of power dynamics, and not to mention it directly violates Title IX. We instituted a rule against RPLs and TAs posting about their students in a sexual or romantic way since it was making people—myself especially—feel uncomfortable and unsafe. We got a really surprising amount of backlash for instituting that rule.

Moderator 2: We have some other rules that we’ve developed over time, for example, that it’s not okay to out people’s sexuality or gender without their explicit consent. We have a group chat where we check in five, ten times a day. So, yeah, we sometimes approve discourse-centric posts if they could lead to genuine productive conversations. We don’t want to silence discourse. The primary goal is to be a supportive, positive community. In terms of the discourse we choose to approve, there are a lot of negative outlooks. Sometimes we comment on posts right after we publish them, to directly respond to the post, set guidelines for the future, or to point toward helpful resources.

 

What do you do if you find a submission is addressed to you?

Moderator 1: I think I react the same way anyone else would. You feel warm and fuzzy, you smile a lot to yourself, then you message your friends, “Did you see this?” and “Who did this?” The only difference between my reaction and yours is that I then perform the narcissistic act of copying and pasting the post onto the page for all to see. Then there’s also the attacks. We censor attacks on other people, we don’t want people to feel hurt from this page. But some posts target us. We’re the only ones who have to see any hateful posts, but that’s sort of a negativity we set ourselves up for.

 

What are some perks of being a BBA moderator?

Moderator 2: Getting to see all the piping hot tea on campus first!

Moderator 1: You know how you open Facebook, and check if BBA updated? We open up a Google Sheet and see posts the second people click Submit. (To Moderator 2) Should I show her?

Moderator 2: Yeah, I think it’d be cool.

(Here, Moderator 1 demonstrated by posting a pending submission. The intake form was meticulously organised and color-coded.)

Moderator 1: We’re absolutely up to date with the drama on campus. I get to promote the voices of underrepresented identities on campus, especially narratives around LGBTQ people, people of colour – discourse people might shy away from if their names were attached to them.

 

When we messaged the original BBA, they said they’re “in transition.” Are they your competition? If so, what will you do when/if they resurface?

Moderator 1: It would be great if they came back. If people wanted to migrate back to them, that’s great! We can’t change that. I’d probably go back to using them. As long as there’s a social platform for positive, anonymous voices on campus, moderated in a socially responsible way, I’m happy. Until then, we’re going to keep having fun.

Moderator 2: We messaged them during the summer and asked if they wanted any help. They said they were “in transition and working on it”. They put out one round of posts in August, then nothing. Then we started Blueno to fill the void and we’ve been able to be much more active. So I’m not holding my breath.

 

What are Blueno’s opinions about Rodent versus Ratty?

Moderator 1: Blueno prefers The Ratty, but he forgives anyone who calls it the “Rodent” if—

Moderator 2: If they leave him a present in mailbox number **** (Moderator 2’s mailbox number censored for anonymity)

 

Does Blueno have any admirers? Who would he admire if he could?

Moderator 1: Everyone knows Blueno has a crush on the Nelson bear. Who doesn’t. He’s buff as hell.

Moderator 2: How could he not? There’s also a torrid past between Blueno and the rock tree, but why bring up history?

Moderator 1: And Marcus Aurelius on equestrian has been eyeing Blueno for quite some time, but who knows when he’ll make a move.

 

What does Blueno mean to you?

Moderator 2: Well, there was initially a lot of controversy about the statue, his funding.  And obviously, lots of schools have a bear as their mascot. But Blueno is his own thing, his own icon, he’s not just a generic teddy bear. Blueno is unique to Brown, Blueno is blue—

Moderator 1: Blueno is blue? Hot-take.

Moderator 2: Thank you. He’s quirky, a little weird, but we still love him. That says a lot about the Brown community. He’s gonna leave eventually,  and I’m sad about that. But Blueno’s legacy at Brown will be here a long time even after he’s gone – ideally, with Blueno Bears Admirers sticking around as long as people want it. Blueno sort of gives us a new life, especially if you consider student activities in his hollow interior.

Moderator 1: If BBA was responsible for your relationship, you’re welcome. If you get married to someone you found on BBA, you are contractually obliged to fly us out to your wedding. (Reporter’s note: The Blog was unable to verify this claim.)

Moderator 2: I think it’s fun how different Blueno is from the statue – he doesn’t stand for the same ideals, and he’s a fun piece of campus culture.

Moderator 1: It’s very representative of our generation, that we’re able to make light of and personify big, unchangeable things. He’s become a part of campus culture. We’ve had some amazing artwork come in from illustrators on College Hill; we had one for National Coming Out Day and one for Halloween—shoutout to Felix Summ and Julia Chu! The world seems really bleak right now, and I think we need more fun, happy things on campus. Untitled Lamp/Bear is going away in a few years, but we’re all creating Blueno, and there’s some permanence in that.


The best club (names) at Brown

The second semester activities fair is tomorrow tonight, and if you went first semester (ehem, freshmen), you’ll know it’s a completely intimidating affair with hoards of people crowded into a narrow space and hundreds of upper classmen demanding your email if you so much as glance at their poster. So, if you choose to forgo second semester activities in the much more civilized Alumae Hall (or just forgot), never fear! Brown has a nifty interface called BearSync that lists all of the 400+ clubs in a Facebook style fashion with a profile and a newsfeed of current happenings. And if that’s still too much for you to handle, some Brown clubs have particularly creative names that you should join for the sole purpose of being able to tell someone with a straight face you are a part of the ARRR!!! Club (said with truth enthusiasm).

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                 Proof of first semester madness

Beard Appreciation Society: I would imagine this club is a must for any semi-hipsters school. Their profile page claims to critique famous facial hair and discuss beards in the news and social media, and you don’t even need to have facial hair! While it’s unclear if any of that actually happens or not, the name will definitely make you chuckle.

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So many styles to discuss! Continue Reading


Hard in da Tank: A round-up for 2015

Spring Weekend tanks can be so many things: oddly specific, occasionally unflatteringly, aggressively well designed, and in support of a good cause. Another year means another round-up, so that you, the consumer, can make an informed decision on which piece of apparel you will be almost puking on ROCKING come April. Welcome to the line-up release party, swag edition.

The feminist killjoy:

Shout-out to our fellow student publication, bluestockings, for taking a b.s. insult and turning it into an awesome tank. Also, a shout-out to booster.com, which really wants us to know that the colors shown may vary from shirt to shirt. Proceeds go towards keeping bluestocking’s website, magazine, and workshops alive and well. $20 here.

The tanks that won’t leave you alone:

From Facebook groups to posters in the Jameson bathroom, these babies have been everywhere. The dizzy bear design is solid, and the plant-friendly option could always be reincorporated into your wardrobe later in the month… or if Willie Nelson visits Providence. $15 here, before shipping and handling.

The throwback:

sape

For everyone who is bummed that neither the Backstreet Boys or the Spice Girls will be making an appearance this Spring Weekend, these tanks are for you. Also, for everyone who loves and requires consent (which should, indeed, be everyone). The shirts are relevant, and the altered lyrics are extremely catchy. Friends may last forever but Spring Weekend never ends. $16 here, and “profits go towards sexual assault prevention education, and the Day One Sexual Assault and Trauma Center.”

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Blind Bears: BlogDH’s new dating game

UPDATEA previous version of this post contained inappropriately cited language in its instructions for contacting Blind Bears. It has since been amended. BlogDailyHerald sincerely regrets the error.

House of Cards Valentine’s Day is fast approaching, and the singledom that seemed so appealing during our Halloween shenanigans is beginning to look a little bleak in the gray February light. These days, it seems that finding a significant other is as difficult as finding a summer internship (read: near impossible), and, let’s be real, Brown Admirers can really only get you so far in the dating world.

So we decided to take things into our own hands: enter Blind Bears. In a new column inspired by NYU Local’s Now Kiss, we’re offering you the chance to be set up on blind dates with your fellow students. Here’s how it works:

  1. Give us some info about yourself and the kind of person you’d like to be matched with here.
  2. Behind the scenes, we will pair you with a fellow Brunonian. We’ll let you know where and when you will be meeting your date.
  3. Enjoy your date, on us! (Ed. Don’t expect Al Forno).
  4. Email blogdhblindbears@gmail.com about how it went (and be ready to answer a few questions).
  5. The next post of Blind Bears will star Y.O.U.

Whether your date ends in an awkward handshake or leads to a Facebook official relationship, at least you put yourself out there. At the end of the day, we just want y’all to have fun. Happy dating!

Please only submit if you are Brown University students. Only those logged into their brown.edu email addresses will be able to access the spreadsheet. All names in the article may be changed upon request. 


Ra Ra Brunonia: A history of bears

After a brief hiatus (and it has actually been brief this go-round!), Ra Ra Brunonia is BACK with a titillating installment on bears aplenty, bears galore. As Nick Bibby’s bronze, indomitable bear sculpture travels to Providence by boat in a massive reinforced steel container, it only seemed appropriate to dive into Brown’s century-long, storied relationship with its beloved mascot, the bear. For contemporary students, the robust Kodiak bear in Meehan Auditorium reigns as the most Ursus arctos presence on campus. According to Encyclopedia Brunoniana, alumni Ronald M. Kimball ’18 and John J. Monk ’24 solicited funds to donate that Kodiak bear to the University in October 1948, and they were even thoughtful enough to cover the cost of the bear’s mothproofing.

Brown University, Providence, RI by Elliott Erwitt

In 1955, the legendary documentarian Elliot Erwitt photographed the Kodiak bear, entitled the image “Brown University, Providence, RI,” and included it in his book Museum Watching. The Kodiak bear’s portrait is in good company within this oeuvre: Erwitt shot some of the most iconic images of the 20th century, ranging from grieving first ladies, to scenic trysts, to celebrities, to whimsical compositions of dogs. But, as photogenic and statuesque as Meehan’s Kodiak bear is, there were days long ago when Brown’s mascot could be found beyond the confines of a glass case…

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The Netflix Files: March 16, 2011

“What used to be called ‘reruns’ on television is now called Netflix,” observed Comcast chairman and CEO Brian Roberts in a recent interview. Especially in the case of serial dramas, where enjoyment relies on following multi-episode storylines religiously, Netflix has emerged as an infinitely valuable resource. All episodes of LOST, for instance, were made available on Watch Instantly before the premiere of the final season — and with no limitation on viewing hours, subscribers could binge-watch the entire series in preparation. Because as any LOST fan will tell you, a single missed episode can completely compromise one’s understanding of the series (except for the Nikki & Paolo episode, which you can totally skip). Even cancelled serial actioners with unresolved narratives, such as FlashForward, Heroes and Kidnapped, have been made increasingly available — the notion of engrossing oneself in a continually unfolding drama is an appealing one.

This week, we profile what may very well be the best serial action drama to ever grace television screens.

There are lot of pre-conceived notions about Battlestar Galactica, especially among those who are wary of science fiction elements in their entertainment. Yes, it aired on The Sci-Fi Channel. Yes, it’s Dwight Schrute’s favorite show. However, it’s way more accessible than Star Trek. There are no aliens, holograms or lightsabers. Just cyborgs. And if you can buy into that (it’s easier than LOST, we promise), Battlestar Galactica transcends its sci-fi genre, proving to be one of the best post-apocalyptic, politically-charged thrillers in recent history.   Continue Reading