Not Long Now, a senior choreography showcase

Not Long Now, a senior choreography showcase by Emma Blue Russo, opened today at Stuart Theatre. The show is impressive on many counts: the eight dance numbers are set entirely to the music of James Blake and it is relatively unprecedented to give a student full reign of Stuart.

The first act explores themes of “urgency, coping, and healing through movement” while the second presents a series of dances drawn from influences on Russo’s creative identity as a choreographer. From inspired choreography to talented performers, aided by music that draws on elements of funk and electro-pop, the show is a cohesive production of dance, light, and sound.

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PW Presents: For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide / When The Rainbow is Enuf

There is only one more chance to see For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide / When The Rainbow is Enuf in the Downspace and I highly suggest you take it.

This emotional piece weaves monologues and movement into a depiction of the simultaneous hardship and empowerment of being a woman of color. The fourth wall is broken down throughout the play as the actresses stare directly at their audience. The show twists through stories with jolting endings, making this actor/audience connection all the more unsettling–and effective.

While the show issues a trigger warning for rape, domestic abuse, violence, mental health, and suicide, there are also light-hearted moments that breathe a sigh of relief into the piece without trivializing the more severe material. The poetry is lyrical and layered and it is worth it to see the show just for the brilliant script. But what infuses the text with gripping significance is the incredibly dedicated performances given by the seven actresses. Directed by Nikteha Salazar ’16, this show is brutally honest and complexly beautiful.

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Sock and Buskin Presents: 410[Gone]

Trigger Warning: This play discusses and depicts issues of mental illness, as well as suicidal thoughts and action. A list of mental health resources is available here.

"As you note the fire exits and turn off your cell phones, please recall the face of a loved one you are soon about to forget."

“As you note the fire exits and turn off your cell phones, please recall the face of a loved one you are soon about to forget.”

Written by Frances Ya-Chu Cowhig ’05 and directed by TAPS Department Chair Erik Ehn, 410[Gone] is a theatrical powerhouse. Set in an arcade located under a mountain in the Shandong Province of China (yes, you read that right), the play whimsically and effectively blends the modern experience of two Chinese-American young adults with ancient lore concerning the Chinese Land of the Dead.

The semi-autobiographical play follows Twenty-One (Kathy Ng ’17) as she pieces together the details surrounding the suicide of her younger brother, Seventeen (Bee Vang ’15). Seventeen’s suicide is rooted in reality for Ya-Chu Cowhig, who lost her own brother to suicide.

Despite a basis in real-life events, much of the play takes place in a fantasy land. Traversing the road from life to afterlife, the siblings encounter the Chinese Land of the Dead, which is stylized in the play as an arcade. This is a land where souls are transformed from life to death through following their footsteps in life as a game of Dance Dance Revolution.

The Land is inhabited by the mischievous Monkey King (Pei Ling Chia ’15), who has been condemned to labor beneath the mountain, and the Goddess of Mercy (Ziyi Yang ’16), who has chosen to live on earth until all beings have been freed from the cycle of rebirth. Ox-Head (Lizzy Callas ’15) is a non-speaking presence who looms onstage for the duration of the show, emerging at the climax of the play to fulfill the role as the bearer of the Soup of Forgetting.

The play’s connection to last week’s events is not lost on the cast and crew. Director Erik Ehn noted: “There is a cloud on campus; we mourn the loss of Hyoun Ju Sohn. Our play concerns issues so close to recent events. We go forward with the play because we believe that the act of making theater can be light that filters through the clouds.”

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