The Brown/RISD Beard Competition: A Recap

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No-shave November is in full swing, and it is a perfect time to celebrate all forms of facial hair. Last Saturday, Brown University Beard Appreciation Society (BUBAS) sponsored the inaugural Brown/RISD Beard and Mustache Competition. Nine hairy hopefuls competed in five categories: Mustache, Whiskerina (women with fake facial hair), Five O’Clock Shadow, Partial Beard, and Full Beard. The entrants were scored by three local facial hair aficionados. A beardless MC named Stew officiated the competition.

When called forward, the competitors walked across the front of the room, displaying their facial hair to the audience and judges. MC Stew would ask the competitors a few questions about facial hair, but spent most of the competition making fun of dreadlocks, Davy Jones, Thoreau’s Walden, and more.

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Audience participation was encouraged.

Though the event drew fewer participants than BUBAS had hoped for, the facial hair on display was impressive. Patrick (Brown) won the mustache award with his twisted handlebar. Patrick put up a good fight in the Partial Beard division as well, but lost to Eliot (Brown), who sported a thick goatee and two voluminous muttonchops. Catherine (RISD) was the only entrant in the Whiskerina division and won by default. But the judges commended her for the creative way in which she had pulled her hair into a silky mustache. The Five O’Clock Shadow field was also won by default.

A few RISD students and one shaggy Brown student vied for the prestigious title of Full Beard champion. Jake (RISD) displayed a clean and even beard that he attributed to “good genes.” Emory (RISD) wore a more free-form beard that covered his cheeks and chin in thick facial shrubbery. Noah (Brown) sported a curly look.

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Emory, the 2014 Brown/RISD Full Beard champion.

It was close, but Emory emerged the champion and walked out with a bottle of professional-grade beard oil.

Anyone looking to participate in next year’s Beard and Mustache Competition should start eating lots of keratin. For, as MC Stew pointed out, “beards are made of protein.”

Images via Ari Snider ’18. 


folkmade.org launches tomorrow

folkmade websiteFolkmade.org, a website created by a small group of Brown students and led by Fiora MacPherson ’16, provides a platform for College Hill artists to share both their work and their stories.

The idea was conceived earlier this year, when MacPherson and some friends decided that it was time to improve connections between Brown/RISD artists and the greater College Hill community. Folkmade’s mission statement illustrates this goal; the website aims to “acknowledge the talent in our community” and “celebrate the homegrown makers of our campus” by giving them a way to share their work and their passion with their neighbors. And the organization has done just that; Folkmade will transform the presence of the local art community in everyday life on College Hill.

At folkmade.org, consumers can purchase authentic artwork created by Brown/RISD students. The single unifying feature of the products is their excellent quality; aside from that, the store features a wide array of incredible artwork that spans many styles and mediums. Currently, pieces range in price from $5 to $100 and the product list ranges from oil paintings all the way to literal benches. And that’s only the beginning.

According to MacPherson, the online store will grow with time; artwork will be added in frequent intervals, so the store functions as an ever-evolving showcase of the wealth of beautiful art being produced on the Hill.

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Clubs we NEED at Brown

Yeah, everyone gets it, we are hipster chic, trendy, and douchey, so our clubs should embody whats makes Brown Brown. There is the Anime Society, the Aerial Arts Society, the Swan Ballet Club, the Bulgarian Club, the Brown Noser, BlogDailyHerald (Pulitzer Prize-winning I may add…pending further review), the Brown Daily Herald, and so many others. Luckily, just like my fat cousin always says, “there is always room for more.”

Because my GPA already sucks, I have spent the last 36 minutes of my FYS drafting the ultimate list of clubs that I don’t want but that I NEED on campus A$AP. And. Here. We. GOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!

The Model UN Hecklers

This is just like Model UN, but instead of participating in a UN-inspired, student run forum, in this club we heckle and and prank those involved in Model UN. This is not an attack on Model UN; they’re great. Rather, this is me airing out some personal issues from high school due to a particularly competitive and arrogant Model UN squad that loved to talk about Model UN, the dances and how many guys/girls with braces they made out with. In high school there was nothing I wanted to do more than to let off a stink bomb, kidnap a Ecuadorian delegate, turn on the lights at one of the dances, or just streak through one of their “worldly and important” meetings. So why not do it now?!?! This club would heckle and mess with the Brown Model UN group as well any high school Model UN’ers who come to campus.

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Sock and Buskin Presents: Hype Hero

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Despite the old school rap blaring as you enter Stuart Theatre and the traditional set with which you are greeted onstage, a drab government building overladen with mahogany and filing cabinets, Sock and Buskin’s new play Hype Hero is, above all, about modernity. It is simultaneously futuristic, current and archaic. It is a hyper-real representation of America, circa 2014.

Hype Hero, written by Dominic Taylor MFA ’95 (in typical open curriculum fashion, he also received a bachelor’s degree in engineering from Brown) and directed by Kym Moore, is described by the playwright as “an afro-futurist Comedy of the Absurd.”

And absurd it definitely is. Everything is slightly off–the phone ringing sound effect is eerily hollow, soldiers burst on and off the stage, and the entirety of the first act takes place outside the Mayor’s (Crystal Kim ’16) office. The Mayor is a bumbling bureaucrat, a dictatorial, paranoid and ineffective leader in a dress wrought with sequins and ruffles. Kim’s portrayal is spot-on, channeling Elizabeth Banks in The Hunger Games and every political leader since Abraham Lincoln. 

But the show is not Kim’s. It’s Sarah’s, Kim’s “administrative assistant,” played with equal reserve and ferocity by Jordan DeLoach ’15. Her role as Sarah is complex, requiring her to navigate both cultural and personal allegiances while remaining in her office chair almost the entire show. DeLoach is both the most active and inactive member of the cast, symbolically as much as literally. Her facial expressions, physicality and vocal shifts (at times performing “propriety,” especially when talking to The Mayor, at others employing use of vernacular, depending on her audience) are integral to her construction of Sarah.

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An interview with the Dinner Party Download’s hosts Rico Gagliano and Brendan Francis Newnam

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A few weeks ago, BlogDailyHerald got the chance to interview the hosts on our favorite Rhode Island Public Radio program: The Dinner Party Download. Hosts Rico Gagliano and Brendan Francis Newnam structure their radio show like a dinner party, with segments that emulate etiquette lessons and a cocktail hour. In recent episodes, Rico and Brendan have interviewed the likes of Elisabeth Moss, Daniel Radcliffe, Mel Brooks, Greta Gerwig, and Bill Hader. In one hour of airtime, the hosts aspire to catch busy people up with what the hell is going on in culture each week… and the show was even endorsed by Queen Gwyneth on goop, which is pretty much a Michelin Star for groovy public radio shows. Read on after the jump for our conversation about Dutch currency and horse-sized ducks:

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Ass-less chaps and timeless wisdom at Cinebrasil

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Cinebrasil is part of the Watson Institute’s Brazil Initiative

I went to Cinebrasil, Brown’s annual Brazilian film series, to enrich my understanding of foreign cultures and score participation points for my Intro to Portuguese class. The film they showed was Tatougem (translated to English, “tattoo”), a drama that follows a LGBTQ theater group called The Star Spangled Floor. The film is set in the 1970′s when Brazil was ruled under a military dictatorship.

Before the movie, a professor from the Portuguese and Brazilian Studies Department told the crowd that Brown has the largest collection of Brazilian films in the U.S. (woot woot). The professor then promised that the film would be a “steamy story of chaos and liberation.” As the lights dimmed, I made a baldfaced grab for the armrest before the guy sitting next to me could get to it. Boom. Ready to go.

I’m not going to summarize the plot for you, because Wikipedia can do that a lot better than I can. I’m just going to share with you some interesting aspects of the film.

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“Resorting to sensuality, they did get some laughs.” —A newspaper quoted in the film, referring to the Star Spangled Floor (above)

If you want to see the sun and the moon get in a fight, watch Tatouagem. Towards the end of the film, two performers in the Star Spangled Floor—one painted silver like the moon, the other golden like the sun—start going at each other during a performance. Sun disses the moon for not being radiant, but Moon counters that he does not need to be because he just reflects the light of the sun. Sun then insults Moon’s ugly craters. Moon counters with, “Yeah, well at least I don’t have all of your disgusting eruptions!” That just about settles it.

In my beginners’ Portuguese class I’ve learned to say things like, “Hello! After breakfast in the morning I generally ride my bicycle rapidly to Portuguese class, but it’s Wednesday so the chalk is not joyful, no.” Unfortunately, the characters in the film rarely discussed their post-breakfast transportation habits or the disposition of writing implements, so I had to rely mostly on the subtitles.

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