Concert Knowledge: 7 things I learned at Bo Burnham’s MAKE HAPPY tour

Bo-Burnham

Bo Burnham came to Providence Friday night, for the third stop of his Fall 2015 MAKE HAPPY tour. Burnham is a comedian, musician, and writer. Starting out of YouTube at the age 16, Burnham was the youngest comedian to record a Comedy Central special at the age of 18. He’s recorded two hour-long specials since then – Words, Words, Words in 2010 and what. in 2013. Burnham also wrote and starred in the MTV series Zach Stone is Gonna Be Famous, is hilarious on Vine, and wrote a bestselling poetry book, EGGHEAD.

Burnham performed Friday night at the gorgeous VETS auditorium, and he killed it. Here are the 7 things I learned at MAKE HAPPY 2015:

1. WolfCop is a must (?) see

Burnham’s opener, Adam Newman from Comedy Central, gave a hilarious raving review/reenactment of WolfCop, a Sharknado-esque 2014 movie on Netflix that’s fairly self-explanatory (read: werewolf and cop). However, as Newmann animatedly described, this werewolf movie is the only one where the protagonist transforms into a werewolf wiener-first. WolfCop (aka Lou Garou) transforms into a werewolf mid-pee, and the transformation is a progression of approximately “wiener to potato to explosion.” My friend and I started watching it after the show, and it’s definitely, as Newman argued, a must see. The Netflix description: “After being transformed into a werewolf, a boozy cop uses his new powers to tangle with devil worshipers, shape-shifters, and other minions of evil.” I mean…

2. Bo is tall, so very tall (and also very fluid)

Yes, Bo is ridiculously crazy tall in person, a friend you’d definitely want to take apple picking. At 6′ 5″, Bo was easy to see on stage, sporting his signature white T. The man is just a lot of limbs and is also a very animated performer and dancer. His long legs and arms form a whirlwind of Bo, a fluid octopus of comedy, dance, and sound, if you will.

3. Straight white men have a lot of problems

Bo sat down at his piano and prefaced a song with, “I have a lot of problems, and I like to share them with people,” beginning a satirical, self-aware song from the perspective of a straight white man. Bo belted out a drawn out and melodic, “Straiiiightttt whiteeeeeeee mannnnnn” chorus throughout the song, singing, “Can’t you just leave us alone, and also, no, to the things you asked for” to all the gays and the women’s rights activists.

Continue Reading


Audition Roundup: Upcoming Dates and Deadlines You Won’t Want to Miss

hectic schedule

For many, the first few weeks on campus can be a whirlwind of names and faces coupled with a barrage of dates and deadlines. As a student of any grade it can be hard to keep track of audition times and locations, and it can be extremely disappointing to realize that a deadline has come and gone for an organization that recruits only once a semester/year. The chaotic nature of these first weeks often gets exacerbated by the disparate locations of audition information, resulting in deadline whiplash. For this reason, Blog presents a (hopefully comprehensive, but in no way exhaustive) roundup of fast-approaching audition/deadline dates.

NOTE: many organizations are not featured on this list. There are literally hundreds of awesome groups on Brown’s campus, many of which have yet to release audition deets or have more rolling acceptance policies. Additionally, for the sake of space and sanity, we were unable to include extensive info for each audition/application process–this is just a list of names, dates and locations. If you’re looking for more info (or any info at all) regarding a club not on this list, you should reach out to it directly, search online for a Facebook event, or actually read consult Morning Mail!

Continue Reading


What to do this week: March 30 – April 5

what-to-do-this-week1

Monday, March 30:

Event: Sarah Koenig: Women in Radio
Time: 4:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Location: Upper Salomon

As one of the final events in celebration of Women’s History Month, the Sarah Doyle Center brings you Sarah Koenig, of recent Serial fame. If you haven’t heard of/binge listened to/had an obsessive phase with Koenig’s podcast Serial yet, you need to re-prioritize your life.  Koenig’s lecture will focus not only on the hit podcast, but her overall career in journalism, including her work at This American Life and The New York Times. No tickets needed, but you should probably get there a little early.

Tuesday, March 31:

Event: GCB Challenge Senior Night
Time: 4:00 p.m. – 1:00 a.m.
Location: Grad Center Bar

The Senior Class Board is awarding any senior who manages to stick out the full nine hours in the GCB. If you want to participate but don’t want to subsist on popcorn the whole night, don’t worry: there’ll be free food.

Wednesday, April 1:

Event: Fashion, Art and Activism: A Conversation with Cameron Russell
Time: 6:00 p.m.
Location: Hillel

Cameron Russell is a model, writer, and activist, who gave this pretty great TED talk on how looks aren’t everything. All are welcome to this informal conversation and Q&A.

Continue Reading


Ben Stiller announces “Zoolander 2” and it’s really, really ridiculously good-looking

Ben Stiller and Owen Wilson are back at it. The two announced the arrival of Zoolander 2 by walking in the Valentino runway show as a part of Paris Fashion Week. These two really, really ridiculously good-looking men [Ed. really?] have been mulling over a Zoolander 2 for several years now, but the Valentino show this morning marked the official announcement.

On the runway, Ben Stiller rocked a Night Butterflies brocade suit with overcoat and black Creeper shoes, while Owen Wilson wore a Silk Continent print Pajama suit with Double Cashmere overcoat and Black sneakers. The normally subdued audience of Paris Fashion Week went wild as the two strutted down the runway and exchanged a hateful glare. As they strutted back, Stiller ripped Vine star Jerome Jarre’s phone out of his hand and took a Snapchat video. The whole exchange can be seen in the live Snapchat story “Fashion in Paris.”

Continue Reading


What we’re reading

vuftm7yzjefeeelgutve

One of the most hard-hitting questions of our time has now been answered: “Why Is The Dollar Sign A Letter S?”

The New Republic’s “Labor Pains” discusses the disproportionately negative effect outdated maternity leave policies have on women in the job market. Most shocking is a chart outlining the amount of time guaranteed for maternity leave and the percentage of salary compensation during maternity leave by country. The U.S. doesn’t fare too well…

President Obama sparked debate with his comments at the National Prayer Breakfast on the historical role of religion in justifying conflict. Ralph Peters wrote “Jihadis 14, Crusaders 2” for the National Review Online criticizing Obama for his comments and suggesting that everybody “try reading a book or two on the subject.” The Atlantic published “The Foolish, Historically Illiterate, Incredible Response to Obama’s Prayer Breakfast Speech,” a response to Peters which hits close to home on the topic.

Looking to get your SNL fix? Check out Gotham‘s interviews with the current cast of the 40th season of the show.

And if you think same-sex marriage is only the beginning of the gay rights movement, you’re definitely in agreement with Frank Bruni, the Times columnist responsible for “Do Gays Unsettle You?” The article is a look at whether or not cultural mores are keeping up with the rapid pace of same-sex marriage legalization.

Finally, if your summer job search isn’t going so hot, consider going into sports betting–it seems to be working out pretty well for Billy Walters. “A Life On The Line” goes in-depth into the life of perhaps one of the most famous and controversial sports bettors to ever live.

Image via.


BlogDH Exclusive! An interview with comedian W. Kamau Bell

Kamau

“I may never be regarded as the funniest comic in the country, but I am going to regarded as the most me in the country.”

Comedian W. Kamau Bell is funny, angry, and coming to Providence this Saturday night. Bell’s socially and politically aware comedy has received sophisticated praise from news outlets all over the country. The ACLU recently named Bell an Ambassador of Racial Justice. Bell currently produces a podcast along with comedian Kevin Avery entitled Denzel Washington is the Greatest Actor of all Time Period. In anticipation of Bell’s visit to Providence, I spoke with him about Ferguson, intersectional progressivism, and his adoration of Denzel Washington.

BlogDH: How did you go from the University of Pennsylvania to stand-up comedy?

WKB: I was there for a year and a half and I realized I didn’t want to be a doctor or a lawyer or a businessman, so I dropped out. Ever since I was a little kid I wanted to do comedy, so when I realized that I didn’t want to take the path that was laid out for me, I started to put my toes in the waters of comedy. Basically, that’s sort of accelerated ever since.

BlogDH: Were you a funny kid?

WKB: [Laughs] Sounds like a challenge. I thought I was funny, but I wasn’t the class clown, so I didn’t have a large sample size. I was an only child, so I was really only funny to me and the person directly to my right. A lot of times that person was my mom, and she thought I was hilarious. When I first started doing comedy, sometimes I would do a show and the only people that would laugh would be my mom and my friend Jason.

BlogDH: How do you make your comedy appeal to larger audiences?

WKB: To make a clumsy metaphor, it’s like a war of attrition [laughs]. You have to keep showing up. I think Henry Rollins said, “The only way you can succeed is not to quit.” I kept being an honest judge of my work, as opposed to certain people who might give themselves a blue ribbon for showing up. I also think the thing that helped me most was trying not to be like anybody else. I may never be regarded as the funniest comic in the country, but I am going to be regarded as the most me in the country.

Continue Reading