DJ Pauly D in da house

Gym. Tan. Laundry. Spin.

Gym. Tan. Laundry. Spin.

Need something to do Saturday night? Chances are this won’t solve that problem–but, just in case, we’re obliged to tell you that everyone’s second or third favorite Jersey Shore cast member will be dropping mad beats at the Twin River Casino in Lincoln, Rhode Island this Saturday, November 23.

Yes, that’s right, people. DJ Pauly D (a.k.a. Paul DelVecchio a.k.a. someone you forgot existed) will be returning to his home state to play all his music that we definitely know.

Tickets are actually selling fast because, bizarrely, the 33-year-old Providence native has accumulated a fervent and adoring Rhode Island fanbase. In 2010, his mere visit to a friend at University of Rhode Island incited a riot resulting in an official URI rule: Pauly D can no longer come on campus unannounced. The GTL guru is acutely aware of his adoring fans in Rhode Island, having humbly tweeted after the event, “See what happens when I’m in town for 1 day Lmaooo.”

Continue Reading


The music of SPG

Prescott

SPG DJ Prescott Smith ’16 plays a basement set

It’s arguably Brown’s most notorious party, an event so renowned that students will wait into the late hours of a Sunday evening weeks beforehand merely to experience it for themselves. Commonly touted by the Queer Alliance as a safe space, it has nonetheless attracted criticism from outside media and Brown students alike. But, in the end, what would SPG be without the music?

“At other parties, people are always requesting songs,” notes Ben Shack Sackler ’16, “but at SPG, people are there for the experience, and you try to give them that experience.”  Known also by his DJ moniker Ethos Nebula, Sackler was one of three DJs who performed over the course of the evening, along with Nikos Melachrinos ’15 and Prescott Smith ’16. In total, the three performed for over three hours, providing tunes for the entire duration of the party. So what kind of music, exactly, was featured at this year’s SPG?

Continue Reading


hey at least he's not wearing that ridiculous fedora in this one

Spring Weekend Artist Profile: A-Trak

hey at least he's not wearing that ridiculous fedora in this one

A list of Alain Macklovitch’s countless achievements as a DJ, producer, performer and entrepreneur would make for a pretty substantial profile—but Liam has already noted many of these in his great piece “Why A-Trak is the best choice for Spring Weekend’s electronic musician.” So curricula vitae aside, what is A-Trak going to bring to the table (besides perhaps the most suitable dance track for describing what far too many students will be doing on Friday, April 19)? A great goddamn DJ set. That’s what. Although I’ve left my EDM obsession in 2010, A-Trak’s surprise set at Ed Banger’s 7th Anniversary remains one of my top concert memories. Mixing turntable prowess (prowess might even be an understatement) with a deep knowledge of all genres of dance music, A-Trak provides a unique experience that’s impressive to diehards and dilettantes. Familiarize yourself with some of his production work and treat yourself to an exemplary set after the jump. Continue Reading


Shit We Love: Electric Daisy Carnival comes to NYC

Electric Daisy Carnival, the travelling electronic dance music (EDM) festival that brought almost a quarter of a million people to Las Vegas Motor Speedway last June, is coming to New York City for the first time on May 19th and 20th. Some of you might be finishing up finals around then, but if you’re already out of school and are at all an EDM fan, this is not an event to miss. See below for the trailer for the New York edition.

Continue Reading


Fall Concert Artist Profile: Starkey

Dubstep. Any relatively hip college student has heard about the genre, and anybody who listens to the Top 40 has most likely heard it in action. But do these casual witnesses to the second British invasion really know what dubstep is? One thing is for certain, it’s not a ‘hella cool dubstep drop, bro’ in a Britney Spears tune. Telegraph music writer Gervaise de Wilde put it best when he asserted “[dubstep] amalgamates disparate elements of UK’s urban sounds and cultures into an innovative whole.” While this soundbite was a perfectly accurate description of the genre in 2006, it has devolved evolved as it broke out of its rigid 140 bpm structure and started to incorporate elements of house, hip hop and even reggaeton. In fact, the word dubstep has been misused so heavily in the past few years that it is currently a perfectly acceptable word to describe any kind of music that utilizes gut-wrenching bass synthesizers and incorporates some sort of break beat.

So here’s the question: Is Philadelphia-based Starkey, who is set to perform on Lincoln Field this Saturday, a quintessential dubstep producer/DJ? Probably not. While he has roots in the purest, darkest UK dubstep (see his appearance on genre proponent Mary Ann Hobbs’s show above), he’s managed to create incredible work within the larger genre of ‘bass music’ in the past few years. Bass music, if you’re wondering, is an umbrella genre within electronic dance music that has been making waves in the scene thanks to Diplo’s Mad Decent, NYC label Trouble & Bass and a fantastic crew of producers on London-based Night Slugs, as well as hundreds of up and coming producers in the US and Europe. If you’re into dancing while low-frequency sounds at unruly decibel levels penetrate your stomach lining, you’ll like Starkey. If your idea of a good time is ‘getting chay with Kenny,’ you may consider going to Duke  not be part of Starkey’s target audience. Four essential tunes to get you acquainted with Starkey’s music and more jokes about country music after the jump.

Continue Reading