Stop thinking and go watch Furious 7

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Yes. That is a car flying between two buildings.

WARNING: Spoilers ahead!

On a superficial level, it’s fair to call the The Fast and the Furious franchise just another action movie franchise. Indeed, it has grossed over $3 billion at the box office, and the several sequels have ridiculous, incongruous titles (why did they go from Fast Five to Fast & Furious 6 to Furious 7??). The latest installment, Furious 7, has made a record breaking $801 million since it’s release just two short weeks ago. So if ticket sales and sheer longevity are good indicators, The Fast & Furious franchise is certainly a hit.

But there’s more to these films than just the mindless explosions; indeed, at their heart, these are street racing films, centered around unadulterated vehicular chaos. Furious 7 continues in this vein, with a new slew of cars that range in quality from American muscle to Japanese agility to… I guess we can call it a tank.

The film opens up with a nostalgic nod to The Fast and the Furious‘s “Race Wars,” which seems to be the Burning Man of quarter-mile races. Positioned in the middle of the desert, it’s almost exactly what it sounds like. There are women in bikinis, men with too many tattoos, and, of course, a diverse and jaw-dropping ensemble of gorgeous cars. And Iggy Azealea, because this is actually the type of place she would hang out.

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“Sisterhood of the Night” brings spooky social critique to Ivy Film Festival

Sisterhood

I know enough about movies to say that this was a really important scene.

There’s nothing like attending a film festival to remind you that you know absolutely nothing about cinema. That was the first thought I had as I took my seat for the Ivy Film Festival’s screening of “Sisterhood of the Night.”

It turned out to be an incredible film, my cinematic ignorance notwithstanding. The premise is that of a modern-day Salem witch trial that grips a sleepy suburban town. A group of girls form a secretive cult called The Sisterhood of the Night, and allegations soon surface that the girls are sexually abusing their recruits. But the girls won’t say anything, because they’ve taken a vow of silence.

The scandal balloons as parents and the local media become involved and misinterpret everything. As it turns out, the Sisterhood’s intent is entirely harmless: The girls are just sharing their secrets and insecurities with each other in a world that doesn’t listen to teenage girls.

The film is beautiful and spooky, with lots of ethereal nighttime scenes of the girls running around through the darkness. The film plays off clichéd high school drama in way that’s both funny and self-aware. The characters are lovable, and the quiet suburban setting gives the whole film a slightly dystopian feel.

All in all I really liked it, but I don’t know shit about movies, so take that with a grain of salt.

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