A recap of the State of Brown address

Last night, the third annual State of Brown address was co-hosted by UCS and President Christina Paxson, P’19. The event began with UCS President Maahika Srinivasan ’15 delivering a summary of projects undertaken by UCS this year. Paxson followed with a speech on her own major concerns for the university, noting that she could not give “a comprehensive list of everything that happened this year — it’s a lot, you know that — and the issues we’ve been dealing with aren’t just at Brown, they’re everywhere.” Much of the Q&A section of the event focused on the topics that have been of great concern to the student body and administration this year, including mental health resources, changing the university’s sexual assault and harassment policies, and diversity issues. 

What does UCS do?

Srinivasan began by noting that many students might wonder the above from time to time and she appreciated having State of Brown to clarify their role.

A major goal for UCS this year was to increase support for student advocacy, allowing student activists to either voice concerns to the administration through UCS or push for conversations where they could express themselves directly. To this end, they worked with the Student Labor Alliance regarding the protests for rights of university mailroom workers earlier this year, and they worked with students from the Imagine Rape 0 protests on communicating with the administration.

This year UCS has launched several important online initiatives; wtf*brown (beloved here at Blog) allows students to post and vote on suggestions for the university, and more recently their Textbook Exchange has created an online platform to buy and sell used textbooks, tagged by the class they are for.

UCS has also worked with ResLife to abolish the suite fee for all students; while this year the fee was decreased, they hope to see it gone in the coming years.

The future of Brown academics

President Paxson noted that State of Brown allowed her to answer the question “Where is Brown going?” for the student body, half of which had not matriculated when her Strategic Plan was released two years ago. To that end, she started with a briefing on some of the points of progress on said plan. Her desire is to move Brown’s open curriculum into the 21st century, using technology to embrace the unique cross-departmental education initiatives that Brown offers. An Engaged Scholars Program piloted this year in which students to engage with five departments, and integrate off-campus work into their education. Paxson also expressed desire to “blast away” large lecture classes, envisioning a Brown which uses technology to ensure that the university only offers small, intimate courses.

Diversity in Brown faculty

Paxson stated that the lack of diversity in our faculty posed a major problem for the university. Currently, only about 8.5% of Brown faculty is of unrepresented minorities, which Paxson acknowledged “just doesn’t reflect our student population.” Paxson stated she wanted to double this number in the next ten years; although 16% still sounds low, “it’s going to take a lot of work to do it.” The university has also started a diversity post-doc program, and will be making an effort to focus more on doctoral education in the next few years.

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Careful with the irony, you might be being sexist…

Last week, New York magazine published an article on “hipster sexism,” picking up where Jezebel and Gawker left off last spring when they coined the phrase “hipster racism.” The essential idea is this: the new generation (i.e. us), in its (our) effort to be hyper-liberal and self-aware, mock the old-school actual racists/sexists, but in a way that actually perpetuates stereotypes. Thus, it is the hipsters that are accidentally holding progression back. As you know, us Brown students are up there as the most hipster kids around, which begs the question, are these unnecessarily analytical always-looking-for-something-to-complain-about sophisticated publications worried about us?

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Every vote counts

In an attempt to start anew, Gawker is holding a vote on what the new word for “hipster” should be. As this is an issue affecting all Brown students, it’s important that you have an chance to cast your option of choice.

Here are the contenders:

Doucheoisie

Plus: Was the most popular option, winning 25% of the vote. Sounds pretty.
Minus: Does it really describe hipsters, in particular? Also: Due to our nominal “douche” ban, we might have to enforce its use only in shortened “Schwazzie” form.

Fauxhemians
Plus: Really rolls off the tongue (sexxxily).
Minus: Is it mean enough?

Pabstsmears
Plus: Cleverly references PBR.
Minus: Takes extraordinarily exact pronunciation to distinguish it from a more all-purpose slur.

Probos (professional hobos)
Plus: Pithy; easy to say; might actually catch on.
Minus: What percentage of hipsters are professionals?

Trendsluts
Plus: Deliciously zingy.
Minus: Might offend sluts.