Pollerbears: What is the quietest space on campus?

Even the freshmen must have figured this out by now: Brown students create quiet study spaces where there are no laws mandating silence, and talk and chew food where signs tell us to do otherwise. As rule-breakers and trendsetters, we don’t care that the Rock’s “Absolute Quiet Room” has a sign prohibiting laptop use or that the Leung Gallery was actually meant to be an upper Blue Room social space. We talk or don’t talk as we please! We type where we want. Except for the Hay; everyone respects the Hay.

Rules no one ever has followed

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Particularly laughable is the SciLi’s attempt to tell us what decibel level to speak at in specific areas. I have no idea how many decibels normal speaking voice or whispering is, but I do know that the 00 decibel space is definitely supposed to be quieter than the 75 decibel space. This never happens.

So, we at BlogDH are here to poll the student body on what actually is the quietest space on campus. Silence etiquette is definitely important — it’s basic manners — albeit hard to figure out.

Happy midterms season!

What's the most quiet of Brown's quiet spaces?

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What’s behind the door to one of the biggest magic collections in the world?

If you’ve ever explored around the Hay, you might have noticed a seemingly average door on the second floor. A little plaque marks: “Smith Magic Room.” But upon reaching for the handle, you realize it’s locked.

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Recently, I took a tour of the Smith Magic room, a collection of books and paraphernalia donated by alumnus H. Adrian Smith ’30. Smith was an engineering student who paid his way through school by performing as a magician. By 1948, he was elected national president of the International Brotherhood of Magicians and had already starting collecting all things magicana. His collection, what amounts to possibly the second largest magic collection in the world, was left to Brown.

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