Meet the (potential) pre-frosh

Armed at Meehan Auditorium with nothing but a dry erase board and a bunch of awesome stickers, BlogDH pestered a bunch of accepted students on what they thought was the best thing about Brown. Some of the answers were sincere and anticipated, while others were strange and exciting. Not everyone we spoke with had decided on which school to attend, and a couple of them thought blogging was dumb and refused to engage with us.

After many hours on the hockey rink, (i.e. 90 minutes), here are a few of our favorites. Check out the complete collection here!

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12 Days of Spring Weekend: Pusha T

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What is there to say about Pusha T (a.k.a. “The Cocaine Cowboy,” a.k.a. “The Cocaine King,” a.k.a. “King Push.”)? If you don’t know shit about this guy but you want to sound knowledgeable come Spring Weekend, just refer to Pusha as “the guy who raps about cocaine.” That reference alone will get you pretty far.

Though everyone is most aware of his recent work with Kanye West’s G.O.O.D Music label, Pusha, born Terrence Thorton, has been making music for over two decades. Pusha started the hip-hop group Clipse with his brother Malice (now known as No Malice, but he’ll always be Malice to me) back in ’92. Hailing from Virginia Beach, Clipse got started with a deal from Elektra Records, which was secured for them by no other than Pharrell. “The Funeral,” their first single off Exclusive Audio Footage, bombed commercially, although the video and track are definitely worth peeping.

Then comes all their albums you’ve probably never heard of; if you do want to venture into some of the classic hip-hop tracks, it’s worth checking out “When The Last Time” and “Mr. Me Too,” both of which Pharrell makes awesome appearances on. But if there’s one song pre-2008 that you’ve gotta know from Pusha’s discography, it’s “What Happened to That Boy.” You’ve probably heard the clean version way back at your best friend’s bar mitzvah. This track is pretty close to a masterpiece, save for Birdman’s verse which, like any Birdman verse, is full of really dynamic raps like: “If I don’t go to jail, ni**a, birds gon’ flock / Ni**a sitting on the toilet: bitch, get off the pot!”

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12 Days of Spring Weekend: Don’t Sleep on Waka Flocka Flame

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In a rather bizarre turn of events earlier in the semester, it was leaked that Waka Flocka Flame would be performing at this years spring weekend concert. In the last two years, BCA has booked artists, specifically hip-hop artists, at pivotal points of their careers. In just the short time since his performance here, Kendrick Lamar has surged into the hip-hop scene and is fighting for the title of best rap artist of our generation, if not all time. Chance, too, has started to collab with bigger names and is receiving more widespread acclaim in mainstream media.

So when I found out about Waka’s spot in the lineup, I was a bit surprised. I couldn’t help thinking back to my freshman year of high school, when I thought blasting “Hard in da Paint” made me cooler than I actually was (let’s not forget I was a chubby kid from the suburbs who thought Waka’s lyrics spoke to me). After reliving my glory days, it became clear to me why my memories of Waka Flocka stopped after my first year in high school: Flame’s last mainstream record success, Flockaveli, was released in 2010.

At first, the BCA’s decision confused me. Why would they book an artist whose career was anything but taking off? That was until I realized that Waka has been steadily producing mixtapes since his major debut, has been collaborating with EDM artists like Steve Aoki, and has become one of the most consistent rap artists of the last five years. Though he has not had as much mainstream success since Flockaveli, Flame has continued to produce and create music. What became clear is that though his career may not be about to leap forward, it has definitely not lost its spotlight it once had. Let’s start in the beginning.

Born in New York, Juaquin Malphurs, aka Waka Flocka Flame, soon relocated to Atlanta, Georgia, where he grew up and eventually developed his sound. Atlanta is often considered the birthplace of trap, and Flocka fit right in, starting his relationship with established trap artist Gucci Mane by the age of 19. In 2009, Flame had his first breakout single, “O Let’s Do It,” which eventually peaked at no. 62 on Bilboard’s Hot 100. This spark launched Flame’s career into the spotlight, and he never looked back. After his initial success, Flocka released his debut album Flockaveli in 2010. With Flockaveli, Flame crashed into the hip-hop scene with unapologetic lyrics about living in the trap and his life as a member of the brick squad (other notable members include Chief Keef and Gucci Mane). Known for its boisterous sound and party anthems, some of the album’s more notable songs include “Hard in da Paint,” “Grove St. Party,” and “No Hands.” The album debuted at no. 6 on Billboard’s Hot 200, and Flame was named the eighth-hottest MC of 2010 by MTV.

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Concert Knowledge: 10 things I learned at A$AP Rocky

If you weren’t aware, A$AP Rocky kicked off his 40-date tour, in promotion of his upcoming label debut, with a show at Lupo’s last Friday. Concerts are always great fun, but they can also be great learning experiences. Take, for example, my first concert ever. James Taylor outdoors at Tanglewood. I was six years old, and I was never the same. That day, I learned what drunk moms looked like, what pot smelled like and every word to “Mexico.” My edification has continued into my old(er) age and A$AP’s concert was particularly enlightening. 10 things I learned after the jump. Continue Reading

In Case You Missed It: Dee-1

Though we hardly need another reason to think that Professor Tricia Rose is cool, she has once again reinforced the notion that actually showing up for lecture will reap rewards. Instead of lecturing this morning, she surprised class attendees of her Hip Hop Culture(s) class with up-and-coming rap artist and role model from New Orleans Dee-1. The first half of class consisted of an interview with the young LSU graduate from New Orleans East, followed by an exclusive performance of some of his more well-known songs. Continue Reading


Music for Studying: For the pop music snob

BlogDailyHerald likes study music, so over the next few days we’ll offer a different album/mixtape/playlist for students of all tastes and attention levels. When the studying gets tough, let the speakers earbuds get bumping.

Ever wondered what happens when the guy who wrote and produced Feist’s hit song “My Moon My Man” decides to record a live piano track to back the vocal track from 50 Cent’s immortal “Many Men?” Chilly Gonzales’s 2010 mixtape Pianist Envy, that’s what. In what might be his most enjoyable piece of work without Leslie Feist’s voice, Gonzales mixes sampled hip hop beats, live acoustic piano tracks, arrogant interview sound bites (Gonzales is a predictably self-obsessed music producer) and, of course, rap verses into a very solid mixtape. At 30 minutes, it’s the perfect length for banging out a round of practice problems before taking an hour to procrastinate on the Internet. For some beautiful, densely dialogic pop music, get access to the free tape via Gonzales’s website by entering any email address here.