The Lazyman’s Guide: Avoiding chores this Thanksgiving

For a lot of first years, this week will be the your first time home since the summer. And while you may have gotten used to having your only mug, which you drank tea from once at the beginning of the semester, unwashed, gross and chilling on your desk, your parents are not. You won’t only have to clean up after yourself (what does a bed look like when it’s been made, anyway?), but you can probably count on being asked to “help out around the house.” For the laziest of us, to whom the simplest chores may seem as difficult as running a marathon, here’s a guide to (dealing with) getting out of them.

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  1. Play the Friends Card

Always, always, always have plans. When your dad asks you if you can rake the yard, say “Oh, but Sheila and I were going to catch up over coffee and my guess is it’s going to be a looooooong chat.” Emphasize how much you’ve missed your hometown friends, and how, because the break is so short, you want to pack as much time in as you can with as many people as possible. Don’t forget to throw in some long bit about how sad it is that the times when you are home will become rarer and rarer.

  1. Or Play the Sibling Card. It’s Even Better 

Parents are suckers for seeing their kids spend quality time together. If you have brothers or sisters, pay attention to them. Watch movies, give them lots of hugs, take your younger sister to lunch, etc. Pull at your parents’ heartstrings until they are afraid to ask you for help because it would disrupt your wonderful newfound fondness for your brother. And actually, sibling time can be really fantastic anyway– don’t take it for granted.

  1. Be one with the P-Set

So a lot of us may actually have a significant amount of work this Thanksgiving. Every time you are home and sense your mom might be about to allot you a chore, make sure you are working intensely on your APMA problem set. Take on the homework and take out the home work.

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Frosh-cessities: How to stay in touch with friends from home

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You’re a month into college already (it’s crazy, I know), and as everything (sort of) begins to calm down, you finally have the chance to catch up with your friends from home about all the crazy things you’ve done, people you’ve met, classes you’ve taken, hookups you’ve regretted, and so on. But suddenly, you sit down to talk, and you don’t know where to begin. So much has happened, and you almost don’t want to say anything. For the first time, your BFF doesn’t know who you’re talking about when you say “that guy down the hall with the weird laugh.” You’re starting to come to the realization that you live in distinct and separate worlds, and talking to people who don’t experience your little bubble every day can be hard. But don’t worry! Here are some steps you can take to make it a little bit easier to stay in touch with close friends from home:

1. Have shorter conversations more often. It might seem like a good idea to set up times once a week, or however often, when you can talk for hours about every single thing that’s happened to you. But that can be pretty exhausting and tough to maintain. Instead, try squeezing in shorter conversations, even if they’re only ten minutes, more often. The little details will start adding up so that you have a better sense of each other’s lives, and vice versa. When you have friend drama or ~love~ troubles, your friends will likely already know the people you’re talking about and be ready to jump in with quality advice.

2. Make time for your friends from home. These first few weeks, you’ve probably felt so overwhelmed that you barely have time to eat, let alone stop everything to FaceTime your friends. There’s always something you could or should be doing. Most often, however, you either have the time or are capable of making the time if you really want to. You would probably spend that half hour procrastinating, anyway, so stop with the excuses!

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Frosh-cessities: Five things to do when you visit home

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In Harold Pinter’s The Homecoming, Teddy visits home for the first time in years only to see his wife wrapped up in a perverse nexus of love with his father and two brothers and return home to a life of single fatherhood. How do I know none of us will experience the unfortunate homecoming in Pinter’s play? None of us have been away from home for years. None of us are married with three kids (but let me know if this is incorrect). And none of us are products of the mind of a Nobel laureate. Having said that, the majority of us freshman will be visiting home at some point (or maybe you’ve already been back 4 times because the Providence electronic music scene lacks the character of Brooklyn’s) and may be wondering what to do with your time away from Brown. Check out the list of visiting home necessities to maximize your homecoming after the jump. Continue Reading