BruNews Weekly Round-up: September 29

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Rhode Island killing it: The University of Alabama has released a map revealing the statistically worst things about every state. Rhode Island came in first for the highest rate of illicit drug use, with around 12.5 percent of the population using. Just another fact to add to one of the strangest states in the country. Check out your home state’s fact at Policy Mic.

Too cool to miss: Scientists at Harvard and MIT have successfully created “photonic molecules,” a phenomenon that occurs when photons bind together into a solid state. The coolest part: these molecules could potentially be used to make light sabers. Light sabers. Harvard Professor of Physics Mikhail Lukin stated “It’s not an in-apt analogy to compare this to light sabers. When these photons interact with each other, they’re pushing against and deflect each other. The physics of what’s happening in these molecules is similar to what we see in the movies.” Maybe they’ll use real light sabers for Star War VII. Just maybe (International Business Times). Continue Reading


Crisis in Syria teach-in happening tonight

crisis_in_syriaThe crisis in Syria has been ongoing since March of 2011. On September 4, in a 10 to 7 decision, the Senate Foreign Relations Committee passed the resolution authorizing the United States to strike Syria in response to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s use of chemical weapons against Syrian civilians. The use of chemical weapons killed upwards of 1400 civilians, including at least 400 children. As the international political community directs its attention to the ongoing conflict in Syria, it is imperative that we as college students be informed about the issue. As members of the voting populace, maintaing our status as an informed electorate will help shape the future of this country and of Syria.

Today at 5 p.m., Brown faculty members will hold a teach-in on the conflict in Syria. The professors who will be leading the teach-in are Professors Beshara Doumani (Middle East Studies), Elias Muhanna (Comparative Literature), and Naoko Shibusawa (History); their varied academic disciplines will help shed light on the conflict in a comprehensive, engaging, and incredibly academic manner.

Make sure to head to List 120 for the event. If you can’t make it, you can watch the live stream video at this link. We will also be live-tweeting (follow us @BlogDailyHerald) the event for a real-time lowdown on what our professors are saying. At the end of the event, we hope you will take time to reflect on things you might have learned, as well as the conflict in general. If you feel inspired, reach out to your representatives and express your opinions. Both the Senate and the House have yet to come to a consensus on the future actions of the United States. Every effort you make can help influence the futures of thousands of people.

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