Holiday food, globally defined

 

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                Thanksgiving in a nutshell

Thanksgiving for a number of college students was a chance to have a bit of familial comfort and a respite from the Ratty/Vdub experiences to instead indulge in pumpkin pie, apple pie, stuffing, mashed potatoes, and everything autumnal and awesome. But of course, not everyone at Brown celebrated Thanksgiving or ate Thanksgiving food; BlogDailyHerald went straight to the source and asked a few international students to share their own favorite holiday foods. We posed a survey to the international community at Brown and here are some of the answers we got:

For those looking to mix up the obscene amount of chocolate eaten during the holiday season (hello, winter break ’15), José Soria ’19 of Madrid, Spain,  has your alternative. Jose loves turrón, which he describes simply as “super Spanish.” Turrón is essentially a blank canvas for your sweet tooth dreams. Any variation of a block of egg whites, sugar, and honey is considered turrón, and add-ins typically include nuts and chocolate. (Side note: when I lived in Spain my host family had a basket of turrón on the table for three months surrounding Christmas and it was beautiful.)

turrones

For Ian Cheung ’16, of Hong Kong, his favorite holiday food is tang yuan, which is “composed of these little balls of glutinous rice filled with black sesame, in a kind of soup broth.” In addition to being delicious, tang yuan has sentimental value for Ian because “‘it’s a very non-Western sweet food that symbolizes family union,” and reminds him of visiting relatives and family gatherings in Taiwan when he was a kid. It also has the added bonus of being hilarious to eat, because according to Ian, tang yuan is super chewy and often leaves lots of black sesame seeds between your teeth.

 

 

tangyuan

    Does that not look ridiculously fun to eat?

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A Guide to Olneyville: Tortilleria Inc. and Sanchez Mexican Market

Did you know that Providence is one of the few places in the world where you can find rained fish? In 1900, right in Olneyville, perch and pout fell from the sky, accumulating up to a bucket of sky-fallen fish. Many Brown students volunteer in Olneyville, usually through the Swearer Center, but how many of us are not acquainted with the area. As one of the oldest neighborhoods in Providence, Olneyville  is full of surprises, from raining fish to delicious hidden restaurants to quaint parks. 

One particular wonderful gem in Olneyville is Tortilleria Inc. a.k.a Sanchez Mexican Market. To get to Sanchez Mexican Market (177 Putnam Street) you can take the RIPTA 92 West. Olneyville is past Federal Hill, officially bordered by Atwells Ave, Route 10 and the Amtrak line, I-95, and Glenbridge Avenue. (See map below, Olneyville is bordered in red). The Atwells and Valley stop is officially the closest stop to the market, although you can request a stop at the RIPTA signs between Atwells and Valley and Atwells and Mt. Pleasant. 

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#AYOTZINAPA comes to Brown with teach-in, exhibit

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Did you see these 43 empty chairs set up on the Main Green today? Did you walk by them without figuring out what they were for? It’s fine, you probably aren’t alone in that. But these chairs, an exhibit titled “We are the 43 still missing,” were there as an homage to the 43 students at a Mexican teachers college that disappeared this September after an encounter with local police. The students were on their way to a protest when they were arrested — after a gunfight in which 10 other students died — handed over to a cartel called the United Warriors, and presumably murdered. Each chair on the Main Green today had a portrait of one of the missing students on it. Their disappearance has sparked outrage both in Mexico and around the world.

Last night, the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies hosted a teach-in on the tragedy in Iguala, the town in which the Normal University of Ayotzinapa is located. The Center’s director, Richard Snyder, moderated the panel, which consisted of four women: Janice Gallagher, Paula Martínez  ’17, Atenea Rosado-Viurques, and Camila Ruiz ’18.

Before any of the panelists spoke to a packed Kassar Foxboro auditorium, however, Snyder showed a 5 minute video titled “Mexico: The Wound of the World” to provide some context. Since the beginning of the use of the military against drug cartels in 2006, levels of violence have exploded. The country’s poorest states, including Guerrero, where these students were from, have faced disproportionate amounts this violence.

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A cool thing you shouldn’t miss: Leonardo López Luján

Image via The Dartmouth

If you’re not fighting in the first night of the Shelter Games, here’s an event to stimulate your brain as your peers battle it out for 315 Thayer.

The Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World presents Leonardo López Luján, one of the leading Mesoamerican archaeologists in the world. He will be giving two lectures on campus this week: one on Teotihuacan’s Pyramid of the Moon and the other on Tenochtitlan’s Templo Mayor. López Luján has written over nineteen books and eighty articles on Mesoamerica and is one of the most respected figures in the study of Tenochtitlan and Teotihuacan.

López Luján will discuss his current research at the Pyramid of the Moon in Teotihuacan on Tuesday at 12 p.m. in Rhode Island Hall 108. On Wednesday evening at 5:30 p.m., he will return to the same classroom to talk about Templo Mayor, where he has served as director of archaeological projects since 1991.

For those not well-versed in Mesoamerican archaeology, Teotihuacan is like the Atlantis of Mesoamerican archaeology (aside from the fact that it lacks its own Disney movie…and isn’t quite a mythical city under the sea). One of the most powerful and influential civilizations of pre-Columbian times, Teotihuacan fell in a mysterious collapse in the 5th century AD. Close your eyes and think of Mexico before the arrival of Spanish conquistadors; the elaborate pyramids that come to mind probably resemble those that are found at the Teotihuacan site. Tenochtitlan came later and rose as the capital of the Aztec empire before the Spanish conquest.

There will also be pizza at both events. Can’t say no to that.

Image via