Chow Down Brown: Chicken Roundup

Because of the sheer amount of forgetfulness laziness investigative journalism that has gone into this piece, getting this post up on Blog has been a semester-long process. But it’s finally here: a comprehensive study of the Ratty and Vdub’s grilled chicken selection. At times Canadian, once in a while European, and sometimes Southern, Brown Dining Services has provided us with an extensive and culturally-inclusive poultry menu. We look into what makes Italian Marinated so Italian, what distinguishes Sante Fe from the Caribbean Jerk, and examine the dressing of Cajun Style (punny).

Keep reading, because as a member of the Brown community, you should know about the various flavors that contribute to our campus’ daily chicken menu. We’re kind of kidding, and yet we do believe the sheer number of nationalities of the Ratty/V-dub chicken deserves recognition. Snapshots, profiles, and reviews follow…

Grilled Rotisserie

A little plain?

A little plain?

We have to begin somewhere, so it’s probably best to start simple. Grilled Rotisserie is your basic Ratty chicken: as far as we know, it boasts no dressing or ‘spices’ but is literally just grilled—on the rotisserie, of course. Inoffensive, this is your primary chicken style that all our other chicken is the same as works off of. Definitely a crowd pleaser, but also not going to be causing a traffic jam line at the Ratty.

Montreal Grilled

Mmm, Canadian.

We were skeptical as to whether or not Montreal Grilled Chicken is actually a thing, but lo and behold the spice-masters at McCormick have confirmed its legitimacy with a popular seasoning that includes garlic, salt, onion, black pepper, parsley, red pepper, orange peel, paprika, and green bell peppers. Moreover, our friends at Wikipedia claim that the Montreal deli Schwartz’s first created the seasoning in the 1940s and 1950s when broiler man named Morris “The Shadow” Sherman began adding their signature smoked meat pickling spices to his own rib and liver steaks.  Due to its popularity, it eventually became a norm in Montreal delis and steakhouses. And somewhere along the way, we suppose, the seasoning found its way… to the Vdub. Still, let’s put history aside and recognize that Montreal Grilled is empirically a funny thing to see on a menu.

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