Who’s hungry?

Naked Donut Run etiquette


The Naked Donut Run, or the NDR, is one of Brown’s most cherished traditions—it’s even on our Wikipedia page. For the freshman out there who have yet to experience the NDR, it’s pretty self-explanatory: during Reading Period, a group of students run through the libraries naked and hand out donuts.

That said, here are a few clarifying details: Yes, the Naked Donut Runners are completely naked. But most of the time they are actually walking, not running. And the donuts are actually donut holes.

Brown is one of the few spaces in which this kind of event could happen. We’re used to engaging in conversations about provocative topics—literally and intellectually—and we can become a bit blasé about subjects that are so sensationalized elsewhere. By my fifth semester of experiencing the NDR, I now think, “Sweet, donuts. Oh, nudity, cool.”

That said, watching nude people run around isn’t for everyone. If you would rather not experience this, consider finding a secret study spot to hole up in while other students flock to the libraries.

The NDR is supposed to be a safe space and a fun break from studying for finals. However, there are risks and consequences associated with an event that includes the celebration of bodies, as we have seen from Fox News’ coverage of Nudity in the Upspace and this year’s cancellation of SexPowerGod.

So this week, while you’re studying waiting for naked people to hand you donuts, here are a few DOs and DON’Ts: Continue Reading

Things our parents worry about way too much

scared paretns

For many of us, leaving home marked the start of our adult independence. Goodbye, curfews! Goodbye, babysitting our little siblings! And hello… regular phone calls checking if we’ve been brushing our teeth regularly?

Alright, so leaving home didn’t mean a complete departure from our parents for many of us. Of course, that’s not a bad thing! It’s nice knowing that they still care for us, even though that time they sold most of our stuff at the yard sale suggests otherwise—you’ll never even use that Hello Kitty stationary again, darling. Their phone calls and texts remind us that no matter how old we are, we will always be their little girl or boy.

However, there are things that seem to stress out our parents much more than they should. Below are a few topics that always make their way into our phone calls and Skype conversations with them (and Facebook wall postings, for you unlucky ones).

Our vitamin intake


Even if you weren’t a regular vitamin-taker back home, your parents will expect you to stock up on One A Day and Vitamin-C powder packs for the semester. It’s as if coming to college automatically meant disregarding our health. There may or may not be some truth to this, but the point is that vitamins aren’t necessarily a cure-all to begin with. And really, as long as we’re eating a balanced meal (whoops), there is no need to pop these supplements like Tic Tacs. Different parents also seem to have different vitamin fixations. My mom is especially concerned with my fiber intake, and makes sure to send me a Costco-size box of Fiber One granola bars whenever I receive a care package. Three cheers for digestive health!

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It has begun.

10288748_10151936402575834_8432428213777575318_nSpotted in the stacks. Enjoy!


It’s here.