BlogDH Panel: Memorable Uber experiences

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At some point or another, we all rely on a beautiful little app called Uber to get around. It keeps us warm in the cold, safe in the dark, and ridin’ in style (most of the time). Uber drivers do a lot more than just take us from place to place, however. They often share their stories, give us much-needed advice on life and love, and add a little excitement to our otherwise mundane lives.

This past Halloweekend, my friend and I were bemoaning a certain boy’s failure to notice our presence, as one does in late-night Uber rides, and we were convinced all hope was lost. And yet, after a few minutes of despair, our driver turned around to us and said, “He’s not worth it. You guys are too young to be worried about things like that.” My friend and I turned to each other and realized how spot-on his words were. We then proceeded to throw the thought of this guy out the window and lived our lives like the free youths we were supposed to be.

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After this enlightening experience, I decided to turn to my fellow members of BlogDH, and see if they had any Uber stories of their own to share. Here’s what they said:

“I had an Uber driver try to convince me that Andrew Jackson wasn’t the seventh president of the United States.” — Anthony DeRita

“My Uber driver this weekend overheard us talking about guys and was like, ‘Height isn’t that important…it’s all about their heart’ and then she [said,] ‘and more importantly, you can’t tell when they are lying down’ and she was like 45. She rocked.” — Allison Gordon

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BlogDH Panel: Why Brown?

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With decision day (May 1st) rapidly approaching and the reality of college setting in for high school seniors, BlogDailyHerald presents its latest panel. Staff members were asked one simple question: Why Brown? Here are some of their responses. 

“Brown has the coolest people of any university in America.” – Liam Trotzuk

“Brown makes you into an actively self-motivated person by providing you with LOTS of freedom…But, there’s still obviously a safety net both literally and in the community vibe, so you feel comfortable taking those risks… [The] open curriculum really is a huge deal! No requirements is so awesome!” – Jacob Koffler

“We have a great sense of humor (professors, administrators, and blogs included).” – Caitlin Dorman

“Impressive, motivated, and [very] smart peers, but also nice, chill, and supportive. The open curriculum is really so key — I can’t imagine actually being forced to think of gen distribution requirements when picking classes. Providence is really artsy and fun — great restaurants, museums, music… all the hills work out your gams. The grading system (ABC NC, S/NC, and just not having NCs show up anywhere outside of Brown) sounds ridiculous when I explain it to my friends at other schools but I think it really supports the idea that Brown provides us with a safety net. It allows students to challenge themselves and try difficult [and] new things without worrying about the grade as much.” – Kenji Endo

“We’re in an artsy, fun city but still have the feeling of a campus and community.” – Julia Elia

“Close to Boston/Newport/NYC; super strong arts community and [very] talented [people] here; connections [you] meet and network of alumni [you] can’t get at a lot of other places; [being a Brown student] makes [you] a better/more open/more informed person.” – Danielle Perelman

“Proximity to RISD is key!!!!! Our campuses overlap!!!! Providence is home to the ‘principal art museum for the city, state, and southeastern New England,’ so proximity to Rothkos, de Koonings and Matisses is also a bonus. And out of all the Ivies, Brown has the best Henry Moore.” – Edith Young (she’s technically a RISD student, but whatever…)

“I love how people at Brown are always down to chat about really important issues. Despite Brown’s reputation of being politically homogenous, it never ceases to amaze me how many interesting and nuanced perspectives you’ll hear as soon as you start talking with your peers around you.” – Charlotte Bilski

My own thoughts? There’s simply no other undergraduate institution in the world where you will grow more as an academic and as a person. The community, the student body, the courses, the open curriculum, the campus, the location, the constant open dialogue, the professors, the connections, the diversity, the opportunities, the academic integrity, the social life — they’re all geared towards making sure that you gain as much as you possibly can out of your college experience. Essentially, in my humble (and obviously unbiased) opinion, Brown’s the best school in the world. (Also worth noting: the food’s good.)

Image via Jason Hu ’16.


A Cool Thing You Shouldn’t Miss: Thursday’s Graffiti Panel

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Graffiti artists are known for keeping low profiles and staying out of the public eye, but next Thursday night the Center For the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America is hosting a once-in-a-lifetime exception. Clear your schedule at 6:00 p.m. and head to the Carmichael Auditorium at 85 Waterman (just next to Faunce) to hear some of the most renowned Los Angeles graffiti artists talk about their art, and the relationship between graffiti and the city. Panelists include:

Cache:

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Originally from Guatemala City, Guatemala, Cache is known for his iconic chickens that color walls throughout Los Angeles and speak to the greater human experience. His work has been featured in exhibits throughout the country and focuses on reviving neglected urban areas and questioning consumerism.

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A Cool Thing You Shouldn’t Miss: Ivy Film Festival 2014

Ivy Film Festival, Brown’s annual student-run film festival, is right around the corner! From Monday, April 14 through Saturday, April 20, IFF has arranged an amazing schedule of events to descend upon College Hill. The Festival’s appeal is not solely in its exclusive screenings and guest speakers, but also in the opportunity it gives Brown’s own filmmaking community to showcase its incredible talents. BlogDailyHerald is proud to announce the Festival’s full lineup here, but make sure to check back on IFF’s Facebook page for additional event details, updates, and more information. Don’t miss this valuable opportunity to get a taste of some of the film industry’s latest accomplishments from both on the Hill and off.

Monday, April 14:

Event: Free Screening: Darren Aronofsky’s Noah
Location: The Avon Theater
Time: 6:15-8:30 p.m.

For the festival’s opening night, come see Aronofsky’s latest film, Noah. This movie recounts a story of “courage, sacrifice, and hope,” inspired by the famous Biblical tale in which a man is chosen by God to lead a rescue mission before an apocalyptic flood destroys the world.

Starring: Russell Crowe, Jennifer Connelly, Anthony Hopkins, and Emma Watson

Tuesday, April 15:

Event: Advance Screening: Locke
Location: List 120
Time: 7:30-9 p.m.

Starring Tom Hardy as lead Ivan Locke, director Steven Knight presents a suspenseful film of action and emotional turmoil that all takes place over the course of a single car ride. Locke is “an exploration of how one decision can lead to the complete collapse of a life.”

Starring: Tom Hardy, Ruth Wilson, and Andrew Scott

Wednesday, April 16:

Event: Free Screening: Wes Anderson’s The Grand Budapest Hotel
Location: The Avon Theater
Time: 6:15-8 p.m.

The Grand Budapest Hotel, Anderson’s most recent critically acclaimed venture, follows the mischievous adventures of Gustave H., the legendary concierge at a famous European hotel, and Zero Moustafa, the hotel’s lobby boy and Gustave’s most trusted companion.

Starring: Ralph Fiennes, Tony Revolori, Adrien Brody, Mathieu Almaric, Willem Dafoe, Jeff Goldblum, Jude Law, Bill Murray, Edward Norton, and Tilda Swinton

Event: Skype Q&A with director Wes Anderson
Location: Metcalf Auditorium
Time: 8:30-9:30 p.m.

Following the screening of his latest film, the IFF committee has arranged a Skype Q&A with director Wes Anderson himself! Don’t miss this opportunity to hear Anderson speak about his directorial experiences and much more.

NOTE: Ticketing for both The Grand Budapest Hotel and the Skype Q&A will be released online to the public this Wednesday, April 9 at 6 p.m. If you’d like to attend both events, you will have to get two separate tickets.

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Ch-ch-changes: Brown Lecture Board

Amidst the excitement surrounding the spring lineup for Brown Lecture Board, you may have noticed that the organization is going through a lot (ch-ch-ch)changes this year. BlogDH sought out BLB President Kaivan Shroff ’15 to explain the recent alterations to the process. Here are the basics:

1. They’re increasing their use of social media as a way to further engage with the student population. Shroff described the shift as “a way for students to get more information, and for us to get input and feedback.” They have launched a Facebook page and an Instagram in the efforts to make the details of Lecture Board events more accessible. In the vein of getting input and feedback, Lecture Board has been hard at work on the internet to gauge campus’ reactions to their ticketing processes and events. This includes distributing a variety of surveys, as well as a Google moderator for the upcoming panel that has students submit questions and other students vote on those questions. Last semester, BlogDH hosted a vote for Fall Lecture Board speaker, which got over 1600 responses. Shroff explained, “There’s a trade-off between time and democracy. In the future, we are trying to get these polls up as soon as possible, so we can best represent what the students of Brown want.”

2. The ticketing system has moved online in a new lottery process. Shroff said that in the past “we would have the line circle around JWW, or a spiral in the Kasper Multipurpose room, but the spaces available at Brown for hundreds of people to line up are very limited.” The major goal of the lottery is to equalize the online ticketing process.” Bill Nye tickets literally sold out in 20 seconds… luckily, we could respond quickly to this and changed the distribution to a lottery system, accommodating people who could have slower Internet connectivity or a malfunctioning computer.” An important thing to note is that there will be a standby line for every Lecture Board event, although the number of people let in will vary depending on how close the venue is to capacity.

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BlogDH Panel: Finding a Valentine in class

A few days ago, I decided I wanted to write a post about which classes are best for meeting a partner (definitely not because I wanted to construct a schedule using those classes). After receiving input from several Blog colleagues, I realized that rather than compile their ideas and give myself credit for them, we could compile their ideas and give their actual owners credit for them (in the interest of full disclosure, this concept was adapted from Grantland). So, after a week’s worth of begging for submissions, here are nine classes to find your Valentine in. By total coincidence, I’m registered for a few of them myself. Shopping period ends at 5 p.m. today, so you better get in these classes soon if you’re looking at a shot at love.
–David Oyer 

(BlogDH) Meet People

CHEM0350: Organic Chemistry
Organic chemistry might as well be called orgasmic chemistry. Somewhere in the depths of despair lies hidden a golden opportunity for meeting people. You spend ungodly amounts of time studying together; there’s terminology like “back-side attack”; and if you run out of things to talk about, you can always bitch about reaction mechanisms. Shared interests might bring people together, but shared hatreds get you friends and lovers.
Jason Hu

CLPS0700: Social Psychology
Social Psych features 80-minute lectures on topics such as “Attraction and Intimate Relationships” and “Emotion.” ‘Nuff said. Then again, all the women in the class were in love with the professor, so it’s not like I ever really had a shot.
Will Janover Continue Reading