What we’re reading

On Sunday, after months of speculation, Hillary Clinton announced that she will be running as a candidate for the 2016 presidential election. The Atlantic’s “The 2016 Presidential Race: A Cheat Sheet” breaks down the candidates who have announced and people likely to do so in the near future. Things keep heating up as the time left until election day winds down.



The New York Times‘ Michael Sokolove followed around the Philadelphia 76ers this season trying to get to the bottom of one of their worst seasons in recent history. In “How Long Can the Philadelphia 76ers Go?“, Sokolove explores the team’s history starting four years ago in 2011. He traces their successes and failures, including this season’s opening 17-game consecutive losing streak, to explain the 76ers’ 2014-2015 season.

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Technicians Strike at RISD: A photo essay

On Thursday, the Rhode Island School of Design technicians went on strike after months of contract negotiations with the school’s administration. The RISD Technician Union has outlined its contractual requests on their website. In short, the techs would like a restoration of retirement contributions (which were cut significantly in 2009 due to the economic recession), annual wage increases similar to those of RISD faculty members, and external tuition remission (a reimbursement of employees’ children’s higher education tuition costs if their child attends a school other than RISD). Additionally, the techs object to a raise in their healthcare premiums. The school’s administration and the technician’s union have not yet come to a resolution. For more information on the tech strike, read BlogDailyHerald’s post from earlier this week or click here for the RISD Student Alliance’s new website, which acts as a living document and student resource during this time.

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Images via Danielle Perelman ’17. 


5 things to take away from the Ricardo Lagos lecture

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Former President of Chile Ricardo Lagos came to speak at the Joukowsky Forum at the Watson Institute yesterday. Mr. Lagos is well-known for being the first socialist to take office since Salvador Allende (1966-9), and for standing up to Augusto Pinochet’s dictatorship–when, following an American-backed coup, between 1974 and 1990, Pinochet’s military government detained 80,000 people and tortured almost 30,000.

Since leaving office in 2006, Lagos has been committed to promoting democracy in Latin America and around the world. The Chilean political rockstar came to the Watson Institute to ask one question, Quo Vadis (Latin for Where are you going), Latin America?

1. Latin America is more politically stable and economically progressive than the rest of the world thinks.

Currently, all Latin American states are considered democracies. Some of them are headed by women, and Brazil, the region’s most powerful nation, is currently led by a trade union advocate.

Even though that positive picture oversimplifies the political climate, above all, it shows that the region that was once plagued by conservative dictatorships is now experiencing a paradigm shift to the political left.

At the same time, the major powers in the region, namely Mexico, Costa Rica, Panama, Colombia, Uruguay, Argentina, Chile and Brazil are all projected to have close to $30,000 in GDP per capita within the next 10 years. In short, the region is experiencing converging rates of growth, with some countries seeing double per capita growth rates.

Mr Lagos pointed out that Latin American countries were innocent in the most recent financial recession, but that the region is not estranged from economic crisis. In fact, Latin American nations have experienced so many economic crises that they now have extremely durable systems, which makes growth rates all the more promising. Continue Reading


What we’re reading

We’ll call this the New York Times edition. I guess it really is all the news fit to print.

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Gotta start with some Rhode Island pride. The, you guessed it, New York Times feature, “A Couple Gaining Independence, and Finding a Bond,” follows two people with intellectual disabilities on their wedding day but gets at deeper themes of unconditional love, how we treat those with disabilities in the workplace and what it means to be a full member of society.

What Kind of Town Bans Books,” from the New Yorker (I know, I know) questions conventional wisdom regarding the types of people advocating for banning books through a case study of the writer’s hometown.

In stark opposition to the BlogDH Pumpkin Spice Challenge and in typical snarky fashion, Vice‘s “Fuck Pumpkin Spice” is one of the more entertaining reads circulating the interwebs this week.

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Register to vote before tomorrow’s deadline

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At a progressive university, students feel (and are!) expected to be active participants in our democratic process. But, registering to vote is usually such a hassle, especially when most students have to deal with absentee voting and reregistration. 

Now that the University has graced us with the implementation of TurboVote, a website allowing Brown students to register to vote in under five minutes, we can no longer get away with blaming our lack of involvement on the drudgery of bureaucracy. The deadline for registering to vote in the November elections is October 5th. So, if you’re interested (and you should be!) and have the willpower to get off Facebook for a few minutes to register, head over to TurboVote and do it today. 

Image via


What we’re reading

So long, farewell, auf wiedersehen, adieu...

So long, farewell, auf wiedersehen, adieu…

We’ll start off with an article that’ll make you feel better about your debauchery (or Netflix use) this weekend: Laurence Steinberg of the New York Times’ “The Case for Delayed Adulthood,” which, for a change, defends millennials and our stunted growth spurts.

For the linguist: Slate‘s “Does This Name Make Me Sound High-Fat?” an excerpt of Dan Jurafsky’s newly released book, The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu, which questions whether or not our names for food items are arbitrary or actually sound like they taste.

The New York Times released a beautiful series of photographs devoted to exploring “Children of Immigrants” in America.

Then, there’s Emma Watson putting her Brown University education to work (she actually said that gender was a spectrum) at the United Nations:

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