VlogReviews: 3C2C

This week, VlogDH peeked into the rehearsals for 3C2C (3 Chairs, 2 Cubes), Brown’s undergraduate playwriting festival. Featuring five student-written and student-directed short plays, 3C2C presents the viewer with a healthy combination of absurd, moving, and hilarious moments that demonstrate the creative passion of all involved. 

To see the festival, swing by Production Workshop (7 Young Orchard Ave.) at any of these times: 

October 24th – 5pm

October 25th – 8pm

October 26th – 8pm

*Runtime is approximately 70 minutes.

PW Presents: Marat/Sade


Julia Tompkins ’18, Duncan Gallagher ’18, Harlan Epstein ’19, and Anna Stacy ’17 as inmates in PW’s Marat/Sade.

PW’s new show, Marat/Sade, is a dizzying sensual overload. The play, directed by Andy Colpitts ’16 and written in 1963 by the German playwright Peter Weiss, won the 1966 Tony for Best Play, perhaps in part for its topicality in a period of social turmoil. Its depiction of the frustrations and tensions of class warfare feel no less relevant today.

Marat/Sade is chiefly a play-within-a-play, mounted in a French insane asylum in 1808 by the writer, philosopher, and onetime politician the Marquis de Sade. Ostensibly, the prisoners’ play tells the story of the assassination of the radical writer and theorist Jean-Paul Marat in 1793, at the height of the French Revolution. As the performance goes on, however, it becomes clear–to the displeasure of the onlooking and occasionally intervening asylum director Coulmier (Spencer Roth-Rose ’17)–that the prisoners have their own agenda to press.

PW’s Downspace has been turned for the production into a chained-off ring that feels half-prison, half-circus. A four-piece live band is on hand to supply music, although half of its members also come down to the main stage to play inmates during musical breaks. Four more inmates also serve as singers, and the musical numbers are impressive in and of themselves–tightly and often unusually choreographed, pleasantly dissonant, fluidly performed.

The ensemble cast, some with painted faces, many in ghostly white uniforms, are endearingly strange, dancing, chanting, and hollering in an almost orgiastic chorus. Mention must be made, in particular, of French hornist Zach Woessner’s ’18 midplay contortionist routine, which emerges as a totally unexpected highlight of showmanship. Comic relief is provided by Brian Semel ’16 (a BlogDailyHerald staff writer) as the sneering, sardonic Herald, a de facto master of ceremonies.

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What to do this week: October 13 – 18


Wednesday, October 14

Event: Steve Jobs Free Screening
Time: 6:30 p.m.
Location: Avon Cinema

In case you don’t have midterms on Thursday (or even if you do), come see Michael Fassbender’s take on Steve Jobs in Aaron Sorkins latest film. It’s sold out on Eventbrite, but doors will open at 6:45 p.m. for those who were not able to secure a ticket.

Thursday, October 15

Event: SPEC Presents: Fall Fest
Time: 8:00 – 10:00 p.m.
Location: Simmon’s Quad

This annual event is marked by its astounding commitment to free fall-themed food for students. If you haven’t been already overwhelmed by apples, apple donuts, apple cider, pumpkin pie, etc. yet, this event is not to be missed. There will also be plenty of student groups performing!

Friday, October 16

Event: EXPO vol. II
Time: 7:00 – 9:00 p.m.
Location: Granoff Martinos Auditorium

Brown Motion Pictures and PREVIEW are showcasing Brown/RISD media work ranging from hand-drawn animation to experimental audio. The goal is to provide space for this kind of artwork, while simultaneously making these works to be more understandable by the public… not to mention it’s free and open to the public.

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What to do this week: September 28 – October 4


Monday, September 28

Event: The High Line, Supergentrification and the Street
Time: 2:00 p.m.
Location: Petteruti Lounge

The Urban Studies DUG brings you this lecture on a very hip topic: Manhattan’s west side High Line and “the role of supergentrification in current and planned developments” of it.

Tuesday, September 29

Event: Fall 2015 Tech Careers Fair
Time: 12:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Location: Sayles

Tech employers looking for computer scientists and developers will be here scooping out the future Bill Gates. Happy coding! (As a senior Philosophy concentrator, I am jealous of people who can attend this event. I’m also available for dates.)

Event: Farm Fresh Rhode Island Benefit Night
Time: 5:00 – 9:00 p.m.
Location: Flatbread

A portion of the proceeds from pizza bought this night will go towards Farm Fresh RI.

Event: IFF Presents: Screening of The Hunting Ground + Panel
Time: 7:00 p.m.
Location: Granoff Auditorium

IFF and React to Film are cohosting this screening of The Hunting Ground, a documentary on sexual assault on U.S. campuses and institutional cover up. The screening will be followed by a panel discussion. Doors will open at 6:30 p.m.

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PW Presents: For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide / When The Rainbow is Enuf

There is only one more chance to see For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide / When The Rainbow is Enuf in the Downspace and I highly suggest you take it.

This emotional piece weaves monologues and movement into a depiction of the simultaneous hardship and empowerment of being a woman of color. The fourth wall is broken down throughout the play as the actresses stare directly at their audience. The show twists through stories with jolting endings, making this actor/audience connection all the more unsettling–and effective.

While the show issues a trigger warning for rape, domestic abuse, violence, mental health, and suicide, there are also light-hearted moments that breathe a sigh of relief into the piece without trivializing the more severe material. The poetry is lyrical and layered and it is worth it to see the show just for the brilliant script. But what infuses the text with gripping significance is the incredibly dedicated performances given by the seven actresses. Directed by Nikteha Salazar ’16, this show is brutally honest and complexly beautiful.

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PW Presents: The House of Bernarda Alba

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The House of Bernarda Alba, written by Federico Garcia Lorca and celebrating its 70th anniversary this Sunday, tells a tragic story of oppression. This weekend, the intense drama comes to the PW in a powerfully unique rendition directed by Sam Keamy-Minor ’16.

Upon entering the Downspace, I was first struck by the beautiful set. Designed by Miranda Friel ’15 and Keamy-Minor, it aptly sets the tone–one of tension and priggishness–soon to permeate the play. Next, my eye focused on the stage; the daughters of Bernarda Alba were already onstage, responding to constantly-sounding church bells like puppets on a string–an ominous choice, as throughout the play they’re quite literally caged in their own home.

Bernarda, offstage, has already been assigned a tyrannical identity by the maids, who feverishly scrub the floors. La Poincia, played by Ana Marx ’18, establishes herself as a relatively unbiased third-party figure with relation to the dysfunctional household, while her assistant, played by Kathy Ng ’17, emulates the matriarch’s terrifying nature. Bernarda is finally introduced. Jaclyn Licht ’16 perfectly captures the widow’s domineering nature as well as her intense obsession with maintaining the Alba family’s social reputation.

As the play devolves into tragedy, the five daughters begin to emerge as distinct personalities. In their own ways, each exhibits her own struggle with the loneliness and brutality of life at home. Angustias (Ali Murray ’18) lives in the fantasy of life outside the walls as Pepe’s wife; Magdalena (Calvin Nickelson ’18) sleeps through the day, isolated from her sisters; Amelia (Sammie Chomsky ’18) passively follows along with her sisters; Martirio (Kate MacMullin ’15), the ugliest of the sisters, broods, lonely and unrecognized by men; finally, Adela (Marcus Sudac ’17), the youngest and prettiest of the sisters, struggles to contain her blossoming sexuality and vivaciousness.

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