Sock&Buskin Presents: The Road Weeps, The Well Runs Dry

Although The Road Weeps, The Well Runs Dry is nearly three hours long, this play is jam-packed with action. And it’s completely wild. Like, grab onto the side of your seat, bring a friend to clutch sort of deal. It has Brown written all over it; from the  family dynamics to the shifting gender roles to the unconventional narrative style. Unsurprisingly, it is the brainchild of a Brown Professor, Marcus Gardley. Director Kym Moore explains how Gardley “created a myth culled from our collective past as balm for the soul.”

Here are ten of my takeaways from The Road Weeps, The Well Runs Dry:

1. The set is one-of-a-kind. Before the show began, the audience was invited to walk on the stage and have a look around. There were rocks scattered on the ground, headless torsos, and a massive hole in the ground. Perplexed, we settled into our seats. Soon, an overhead voice alerted us that “the museum is now closing.” Were we pretending this was a museum because Native peoples are always so on display? Or was it just because the stage was so interesting? Already, the play was thought provoking, forcing us to ask questions that couldn’t be answered. Philosophy friends, where you at?

2.The lighting technicians killed it. The creamy watercolor effect immediately established the mood. And as the plot moved forward, the set became drenched in red. The shadows were threatening and distorted our sense of place and time. Going for unsettled? Success.

3. Every sentence in this script drips with metaphor; I found myself scrambling to commit certain lines to memory. Many of the phrases are violent. When the characters argue, they spit out words like bullets, attacking one another mercilessly. But when young Sweet Tea, played by Julia Newitt ‘19, tries to explain her love, we are fully convinced that her feelings are pure.

4. This play is full of badass ladiesThe witch Half George, played by Oyindamola Akingbile ‘17, was particularly striking. Captivated by her strong melodic voice, we are in her clutches the entire show. She reckons that her heart is “hard and rotten” and she’s not wrong. The argument scene between her and Mary South (played to perfection by Crystal Kim ‘16)  is especially terrifying.

Continue Reading


Six types of posts you see on Brown Bears Admirers

e5f1cce44bfd6a2d390fca29bc582184

Let’s be honest: everyone secretly (or not so secretly) dreams that sometime before they graduate, they’ll have at least one Brown Bears Admirers post written about them. And not one of those fake, submitted-by-a-friend-who-thinks-they’re-being-hilarious type of posts. A real, legitimate post by a secret admirer. Who wouldn’t want to know that someone out there is hopelessly pining for them?

Within the Admirers page, however, there are many different types of posts, ranging from full-blown love letters to a lighthearted nod to that cute guy in your math class. Here are six different types of posts you might see on Brown Bears Admirers:

 

1. The actual crush

The writers of these posts are the real MVPs. They’re willing to put it all out there, letting their crushes know there’s someone who’s really interested in them. These posts are rare, but when they do appear, they’re truly a sight to behold. Likely featuring phrases like “meant for each other” and “a real connection from the moment we met,” these will probably make you roll your eyes, but you’ll still feel that pang of jealousy deep down in your eternally single heart.

 

large

Don’t let those crushes stay secret forever!

2. The “I don’t know you, but you’re super hot”

Much more common than posts that praise people for their wonderful souls and strength of character, these are about what’s on the outside. Sometimes you just have to let a person know when they’ve got it goin’ on. These posts can vary from sweet and kind (“you are unspeakably beautiful”) to, let’s just say more crudely put (“literally fuck me”).

Continue Reading


How Not to be a Freshman: Love is in the air

1302026167782_6268320

Hello, readers!  It’s good to be back. After succumbing to Mono this winter break, I’ve had a lot of time to watch movies, go through multiple TV series, read some weird self-help dating books, and bake. I basically became an old spinster over break.  Pathetic? Slightly, but you try having Mono over Christmas.

At home, I met up with old friends and heard about their escapades, problems, and new boyfriends. In fact, I spent one evening listening to my friend drone on endlessly about her beau who almost told her he loved her. Ew. The only thing preventing me from gauging my eyes out with my fork was the chocolate cake that was on its way. Another friend was engaging in a “Friends with Benefits” type thing but secretly wanted more. As I listened to their relationship problems, I reveled in the fact that I had none of my own. I was single and free and boy, it felt good. Continue Reading