Orly Genger’s “YOU” actually isn’t just an art installation

coincidence

By now, you’ve probably walked by Orly Genger’s YOUa.k.a. that gigantic mass of lobster rope on the Quiet Green. The structure, which is allegedly a work of “public art,” wraps around a tree at one end and extends towards the Van Wickle Gates at the other. Viewers are drawn to the structure’s unique contour, layout, and location–features they naïvely attribute to Genger’s artistic vision. “After all,” they assume, “what else would explain it? It was purely her decision–it’s not like there was an ulterior motive behind her design.”

Or was there?

The sculpture suspiciously resembles a number of other very interesting objects, which begs the question: what is the real purpose behind Orly Genger’s YOU?

Here are some possible explanations:

paxson sledding on orly genger sculpture

I’m not saying that this happened, but…

Possibility #1: President Paxson’s personal street-luge practice course. If you had the opportunity, would you learn to luge? You would, wouldn’t you? For that matter, wouldn’t anyone…even President Paxson? Enter: YOU. At second glance, it’s glaringly obvious that the structure is actually a miniature practice course for President Paxson to use when she doesn’t have enough time to get away from the office and go to the nearest street-luge practice facility.

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Art School(ed): 5 reasons you should keep an eye on Eckhaus Latta

df

Eckhaus Latta, a New York-based label created by designers Mike Eckhaus and Zoe Latta, piqued the interest of clotheshorses and journalists alike after their first traditional runway show (of their fifth collection) at The Standard Hotel during the recent New York Fashion Week. Transcendent, quick-witted, and visceral, Eckhaus Latta redefines fashion’s limits. The designers behind Eckhaus Latta, still just 26, have thrown themselves head first into the fashion world and expanded the capacities of a tired (and often market-driven) medium. Here’s why you should keep an eye on Eckhaus Latta, as this design duo churns fabric masterpieces out of their Chinatown studio, after the jump: Continue Reading


Art School(ed): A useful ranking of the Ivy League’s Henry Moore sculptures

bearheadhaley

Hoards of reputable sources, from Business Insider to BetchesLoveThis, have mercilessly ranked the Ivy League universities, but these lists have only compared the same, yawn-worthy specifications (Student Life, Academics, Affordability, Campus, Celebrity Alumni, Location, Greek Life, etc). Can you spot the great oversight all of these useless rankings share? Yes, that’s right. None of these sites have evaluated the Ivy League based on the schools’ respective Henry Moore sculptures. How could they be so foolish to overlook such a critical criterion? Continue Reading


Dartmouth student gets artsy with Keystone

Max Heiges's masterpiece "The Juggler"

A frat’s Saturday night dilemma: after many rounds of beer pong and shotgunning, empty Keystones cover the sticky basement floor. What to do? One Dartmouth student’s answer: turn it into art.

Max Heiges, Dartmouth art intern and football player, incorporated the classic frat beverage into his installation piece “The Juggler.” Much like anyone who supports themselves on Keystone, the sculpture seems like it is about to collapse from too much alcohol intake. But the precariously balanced sculpture stays afloat,  incorporating a couple of seemingly floating chairs and a lot of cases of empty Keystone, all of course donated by Dartmouth frat members. Who knew a Saturday night’s worth of beer could become a contribution to the art world? And, like with any other serious work of contemporary art, we must ask what does it mean? Heiges’s answer: “Nobody rages anymore.” Hmmmm. Right.

What we want to know: why hasn’t some hipster vis art student already done this with PBR?