What to do this week: November 16 – 22

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Monday, November 16

Event: Poetry on the Spot
Time: Blue Room
Location: 10:00 a.m. — 2:00 p.m.

Sending a Brown Bear Admirers is so October. Instead, pay a member of the Swearer Center’s Writers Group $1 and they’ll put quill to paper and compose a poem for you, your admired, or anyone you’d like. All proceeds go towards the Swearer Center’s Community Partnership, offering adults with developmental disabilities creative writing workshops.

Tuesday, November 17

Event: SCAC Lecture Series: Juliana Huxtable
Time: 6:30 p.m.
Location: Granoff Auditorium

The Student Creative Arts Council will host poet/artists/model/DJ, Juliana Huxtable, as part of their lecture series. Free tickets can be reserved here.

Event: DOPE Screening
Time:  7:00 p.m.
Location: Salomon 202

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Eight ways Brown can thrive in the twenty-first century

In the sink or swim world of 2015, you have to be both creative and willing to step on the throats of others competitive in order to succeed. This year, Brown has made notable steps into the future, from breaking ground on a new engineering building and renovating the mailroom, to providing Sriracha sauce to the Ratty. These are great first steps, but they fall far short of preparing Brown for the century ahead. Here are our additional recommendations:

Increase number of Brown-related website portals from seventeen to twenty-five

Dramatization.

Dramatization.

The corporation has talked about growing Brown’s student body by 1% each year to increase tuition revenue, but little has been said about the stagnant number of websites and internet services accessible to Brown students. We need to move beyond Banner, Canvas, GET, PawPrints, EchoCenter, Sapling, Res-Life, Philo, Josiah, Focal Point, Shibboleth, Go, Workday, B.U.S. tracker, IM leagues, Touch.net, JIB, and Brown Connect. Seventeen different portals to accomplish similar tasks is simply not enough. To be a top-tier university in the 21st century we need more websites. At least eight more.

The Blue Room-Mailroom Merger

Blue Room Mail Room

What do the Blue Room and Mailroom have in common? Lines. Why is it that if you want to both get a sandwich and retrieve a package, you have to wait in two separate areas? This merger would both cut costs, and give students one seamless and efficient mailroom-dining experience.

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Students Who Do Cool Things: Jared Rothenberg ’15 and Ivy Sokol ’15, founders of Moving Mountains

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We often take our time in nature for granted. Some of us may have gone to summer camps that taught us how to kayak or build a campfire; others may have lived just minutes away from a beautiful national park. Experiences like these, or even an outdoor activity as simple as a run up Blackstone Boulevard, are out of the reach of many children who grow up in Providence. Jared Rothenberg ’15 and Ivy Sokol ’15 have partnered in order to provide a greater level of access to the outdoors and, in doing so, are joining a growing outdoor education movement. Their new organization is called Moving Mountains.

In their words, Moving Mountains is “an environmental education program for high school students in Providence,” but it can be so much more. The website for the organization lays out a persuasive case for the value of outdoor education programs like this. Not only do they “empower participants to achieve academically, embrace civic engagement, and practice lifelong environmental stewardship,” but they also provide physiological benefits that range from lower blood pressure to improved mental health.

For Sokol, the setting of outdoor education is essential to improving outcomes for kids: “the wilderness is sort of a simplified classroom in which behaviors can be enforced really easily.” Outside the walls of a typical high school, students can “become more self-aware” while — as Rothenberg later added — still thinking about “their local environments, whether that’s local parks or local issues… that might influence their lack of access” to the outdoors. In this way, Moving Mountains’ programming promotes both “leadership development” and “a sense of environmental stewardship.”

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