PW presents: Bunny Bunny, Gilda Radner: A Sort of Romantic Comedy

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If you love Saturday Night Live, clowns, or faked orgasms, then Bunny Bunny, Gilda Radner is the show for you. Director Jenn Maley ’16 aims to make audience members laugh and cry with a script that pulls you deeper and deeper into an original world of SNL actors and writers. Filled with a cast of gag and character clowns, Bunny Bunny explores the relationship between SNL member Gilda Radner and narrator Alan Zweibel.

Years after their relationship, Zweibel, played by Marty Strauss ’16, reflects on his sometimes-friendship-sometimes-romance with Gilda. With limited narration from Strauss and tons of help from character clowns Sabrina Imbler ’16 and Marli Scharlin ’16, the play leads us through the ups and downs of a long friendship. The audience is taken on a journey from the moment the two meet in a waiting room, to their final moments together before Gilda dies from ovarian cancer. Though the story deceptively presents itself as a romantic comedy, it soon reveals its true self as a serious tale of companionship, trust, and dependence. Though the two never end up together in a romantic sense, the friendship they build guides them through both of their toughest times.

Natalie McDonald’15 plays the loud and spunky Gilda Radner whose effect on the life of Alan Zweibel inspires Bunny Bunny. McDonald expertly manages to perform the growth of her character, transitioning from a somewhat-carefree jokester to a grown woman with more wisdom and experience in the trials of life. Together, Strauss and McDonald make for a charismatic duo – Strauss charming us with his wry commentary and McDonald captivating us with her whimsical magnetism. A cast of clowns, which includes Brad Weekes ’17 and CJ Risman ’17, step in to fill in any missing pieces of the emotional and honest tale of the friendship between Zweibel and Radner.

The set of Bunny Bunny also adds to its charm. What at first appears to be the backstage set of a television studio later transitions into characters’ apartment buildings or even the greenery of Central Park. The various props displayed around the set, along with the number of wigs and costumes worn by the clowns, contribute to the overall playful aesthetic of the show. Though Bunny Bunny is by nature a boisterous comedy, the fluidity of the theater space allows it to become a home for quiet and intimate moments as well.

If you take anything away from Bunny Bunny, it is that comedy can sometimes be the best anecdote to tragedy. With a hard-hitting second act, audiences are forced to ask how one keeps hold onto their joy when the world crashes down on them. Through good spirits and the loyalty of friends, McDonald’s Gilda seems to grasp onto her happiness right until the end. The world Maley presents with Bunny Bunny, Gilda Radner relies on its characters’ resilient optimism and will to live, and yes, along the way there are some pretty funny jokes.

Bunny Bunny runs through May 24th. Tickets are available here or at the PW box office an hour before each performance. 

Image via. 


Leach ’14 on theater

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This is the fourth post from our new column highlighting the voices and experiences of students of color on Brown’s campus. In this entry, Hayward Leach ’14 recalls his experience in the theater community at Brown. 

In 1926, prominent Black poet Langston Hughes wrote: “An artist must be free to choose what he does, certainly, but he must also never be afraid to do what he might choose.” Reading Hughes’ “The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain” in Introduction to Africana Studies my freshman fall, I remember feeling simultaneously liberated and constrained by the concept of such a freedom. Hughes wrote this article with the intention of freeing the Negro artist to portray his own life, to not shy away from the complexities and potential dirt of his experience. In scholarship and artistic expression, however, I have continued to struggle with this original contradiction.

Do I have a responsibility to study and portray Black life in America? The easy, individualistic answer would be no. Art should be about one’s individual interests. If those interests align with a political agenda, so be it. On my thirteenth birthday, I sat in the corner of my school bus, on a trip to the Museum of Natural History. I don’t remember much about the ride other than the sticky seats, the din of kids voices rising above midtown traffic, and the gray of February that seems to mark a never ending winter. My birthdays always feel like secrets, moments of light built into the dark fabric of the mid-winter sky. On that bus, where no one thought of anything but snow slush and bus games, I relished in my secret. Somewhere along the ride, I scribbled down: “Art is the expression of the soul.”

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Brown Gilbert & Sullivan presents Camelot

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We are living in dark times. As Brown begins to enter this most trying of periods in the semester–with the riotous celebrations of Spring Weekend behind us and the ominous specter of finals beginning to loom–glad tidings may seem few and far between. In sooth, though the days may be longer and the weather warmer, we are but prisoners; chained to our desks, subsisting on a meager diet of Ratty take-out. These are dark times indeed.

But lo! Enter Brown University Gilbert and Sullivan‘s production of Camelot, a performance destined to uplift you from your dreary existence and fill your world with song and dance.

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A cool thing you shouldn’t miss: Tonight We Improvise

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Rebecca Maxfield ’13 graduated Brown with a bachelor’s in theatre arts and performance studies. While at Brown, Maxfield found time to study Italian and translation; for a final project, she translated Questa sera si recita a soggetto (translation: Tonight We Improvise).  Although she had long been contemplating translating and directing it, she saw the final project as an opportunity to make a first pass at it in a workshop environment. Since then she’s continued to work on the script. Additionally, Maxfield produced The Tempest for her capstone project. Since graduating has directed Gianni SchicchiThe Light in the Piazza, and other Shakespeare, as well as assistant directing various classic and modern plays in New York and in Providence, including The Grapes of Wrath at Trinity Repertory.

This weekend, Maxfield is producing Tonight We Improvise at 95 Empire, formerly Perishable Theatre and now part of AS220. Tonight We Improvise is “a rarely performed play from one of the great theatrical thinkers of the early twentieth century, Luigi Pirandello. Known for Six Characters in Search of an Author, the playwright uses this play to tackle, in a way that is on-point and often hilarious, what it means to act.” The cast and crew includes two current undergrads, Pu-Ning Chiang and Marissa Grier, and an MFA acting student, Billy Finn.

The play will run tonight at 8 p.m., Saturday at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. Not down with the cover charge for whatever party you were planning on attending? Tickets are free for Brown and RISD students!  Escape the chaos that will be the 250th Opening Celebration and head off the Hill to see a really cool performance and support an alumna.

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What to do this week: February 24 – 28

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Monday, February 24:

Event: Celebrate Every Body Week 2014
Time: All day, all week
Location: Various locations

This week, Brown University Health Education has planned a variety of events and activities in honor of Celebrate Every Body Week. In collaboration with Brown Psychological Services, Brown Recreation, Lifespan Hospital, and the Yoga and Mindfulness (YAM) student group, the week will feature various fitness classes, panel discussions, and even a dance party. Check out the Facebook page for a full list of events.

Event: Discussion: Hazing and Initiation at Brown
Time: 8 p.m.
Location: Salomon 203

Join the Brown Political Forum and Delta Tau Fraternity for a discussion about Brown’s policies on hazing and initiation. Free pizza will be served, and this event is open to the public.
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What to do this week: February 19-22

what to do this week

Wednesday, February 19: 

Event: Writers or Missionaries? Reporting the Middle East
Time: 2:00 p.m.
Location: Joukowsky Forum, Watson Institute

Join the GISP “Wiring the Middle East: Nonfiction Coverage and New Digital Frontiers” and Brown Middle East Studies for a conversation with Adam Shatz, Contributing Editor of London Review of Books. This event is free and open to the public.

Thursday, February 20:

Event: The Days Between
Time: 8:00 p.m.
Location: Granoff Center

Check out this new opera by Ben Kutner ’14, directed by Zach Rufa ’14. Can’t make it on Thursday? Don’t worry: there will be 3 other performances on Friday the 21st at 8p.m., and Saturday the 22nd at both 2p.m. and 8p.m. According to the event description, this original production, based loosely on the Arab Spring, “follows four national figures as they weather the power vacuum after their leader’s death – each attempting to ride out on top.”

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