A Cool Thing You Probably Missed: Wedding bells in the PW Upspace

What is possibly the most romantic place on Earth? Obviously Paris the PW Upspace! Although usually reserved for student produced content such as shows and performance art, this past Sunday, visitors were instead treated to a small wedding ceremony, the brainchild of Charlotte Senders ’18 and Ben Hayslett ’18.

The masterminds behind the wedding: Charlotte Senders '18 and Ben Hayslett '18

The masterminds behind the wedding: Charlotte Senders ’18 and Ben Hayslett ’18

When Senders and Hayslett were offered the space for a Sunday show, they decided that the perfect thing to do would be to hold a wedding, especially since Senders was ordained over the summer. So in an impressive five days, they pulled together the wedding with some help from volunteers. And when the original couple fell through Saturday afternoon, they recruited two of their friends and determined the groomsmen at 1 A.M. Sunday morning.

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A few reasons to see 11 Apocalypses

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Do you enjoy apocalypse scenarios? But, no, not just one at a time. Do you want to watch eleven different apocalypse scenarios in the span of two hours? Are you just an ardent fan of symbolism? Do you yearn to watch an unbelievably unique play? Even if you answered no to all three questions, you should still head over to the PW Downspace to watch Evan Silver ’16‘s 11 Apocalypses (showing on Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 7 p.m. and 11 p.m., Sunday at 8 p.m., and Monday at 8 p.m.).

If I still haven’t convinced you, read on for a few more specific reasons to go.

  1. The Apocalypses

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Influenced by old stories and archetypes, Silver crafts a delicately intricate multiverse of eleven separate worlds. The storylines are extremely diverse: a millennial trapped at sea, a woman struggling to answer big questions after the rapture, and a man finding himself obsessively entranced in jazz. My personal favorite apocalypses were Sandy’s (BlogDH staffer Jessica Steans-Gail ‘16) hilariously loopy disillusions while trapped in a freezer and Minden’s (Jesse Weil ‘16) tender, yet excitingly tense interactions with Candace, a robot. However, it would be unjust not to applaud the force of Eve’s (Ellie Gravitte ‘17) and Jupiter’s (Katherine Doherty ‘16) explosive performances in which viewers are struck by the suffocating desperation and complex spectrum of human emotions behind their words.

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Sock&Buskin Presents: The Road Weeps, The Well Runs Dry

Although The Road Weeps, The Well Runs Dry is nearly three hours long, this play is jam-packed with action. And it’s completely wild. Like, grab onto the side of your seat, bring a friend to clutch sort of deal. It has Brown written all over it; from the  family dynamics to the shifting gender roles to the unconventional narrative style. Unsurprisingly, it is the brainchild of a Brown Professor, Marcus Gardley. Director Kym Moore explains how Gardley “created a myth culled from our collective past as balm for the soul.”

Here are ten of my takeaways from The Road Weeps, The Well Runs Dry:

1. The set is one-of-a-kind. Before the show began, the audience was invited to walk on the stage and have a look around. There were rocks scattered on the ground, headless torsos, and a massive hole in the ground. Perplexed, we settled into our seats. Soon, an overhead voice alerted us that “the museum is now closing.” Were we pretending this was a museum because Native peoples are always so on display? Or was it just because the stage was so interesting? Already, the play was thought provoking, forcing us to ask questions that couldn’t be answered. Philosophy friends, where you at?

2.The lighting technicians killed it. The creamy watercolor effect immediately established the mood. And as the plot moved forward, the set became drenched in red. The shadows were threatening and distorted our sense of place and time. Going for unsettled? Success.

3. Every sentence in this script drips with metaphor; I found myself scrambling to commit certain lines to memory. Many of the phrases are violent. When the characters argue, they spit out words like bullets, attacking one another mercilessly. But when young Sweet Tea, played by Julia Newitt ‘19, tries to explain her love, we are fully convinced that her feelings are pure.

4. This play is full of badass ladiesThe witch Half George, played by Oyindamola Akingbile ‘17, was particularly striking. Captivated by her strong melodic voice, we are in her clutches the entire show. She reckons that her heart is “hard and rotten” and she’s not wrong. The argument scene between her and Mary South (played to perfection by Crystal Kim ‘16)  is especially terrifying.

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Audition Roundup: Upcoming Dates and Deadlines You Won’t Want to Miss

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For many, the first few weeks on campus can be a whirlwind of names and faces coupled with a barrage of dates and deadlines. As a student of any grade it can be hard to keep track of audition times and locations, and it can be extremely disappointing to realize that a deadline has come and gone for an organization that recruits only once a semester/year. The chaotic nature of these first weeks often gets exacerbated by the disparate locations of audition information, resulting in deadline whiplash. For this reason, Blog presents a (hopefully comprehensive, but in no way exhaustive) roundup of fast-approaching audition/deadline dates.

NOTE: many organizations are not featured on this list. There are literally hundreds of awesome groups on Brown’s campus, many of which have yet to release audition deets or have more rolling acceptance policies. Additionally, for the sake of space and sanity, we were unable to include extensive info for each audition/application process–this is just a list of names, dates and locations. If you’re looking for more info (or any info at all) regarding a club not on this list, you should reach out to it directly, search online for a Facebook event, or actually read consult Morning Mail!

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Not Long Now, a senior choreography showcase

Not Long Now, a senior choreography showcase by Emma Blue Russo, opened today at Stuart Theatre. The show is impressive on many counts: the eight dance numbers are set entirely to the music of James Blake and it is relatively unprecedented to give a student full reign of Stuart.

The first act explores themes of “urgency, coping, and healing through movement” while the second presents a series of dances drawn from influences on Russo’s creative identity as a choreographer. From inspired choreography to talented performers, aided by music that draws on elements of funk and electro-pop, the show is a cohesive production of dance, light, and sound.

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Musical Forum Presents: The Last Five Years

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Jason Robert Brown’s The Last Five Years is a contemporary classic, exploring the life and death of love through the marriage of Cathy Hiatt and Jamie Wellerstein. This weekend, Brown’s sublime story comes to life as Musical Forum’s latest production. Directed by Andrew Ganem ’16 and Hannah Margolin ’16, this rendition of The Last Five Years is absolutely phenomenal; every element–from the dynamic orchestra to the electrifying voice of each actor–is brimming with passion.

The script, consisting of monologue-songs that alternate between the two characters (each of whom progresses in chronological opposition to the other), approaches the arc of passion from all angles, providing unparalleled insight into the tragedy of failed love through its unique narrative form. This approach forces the viewer into a constant struggle between riding the excitement of the relationship’s beginning and bearing the weight of its devastating end. Brown’s story, complete with all its juxtapositions, nostalgia, and irony, engages the viewer and becomes an emotional rollercoaster for every audience member.

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However, Musical Forum’s rendition of The Last Five Years is so much more than its script; this breathtaking rendition transforms Brown’s love story into an almost visceral experience.

The production is characterized by its stunning dynamics across all fronts. The set, designed by Evan Finkle ’15 and Emma Margulies ’18, is constantly transforming before the viewer’s eye, while the lighting, directed by Ben Chesler ’15 and Emma Davis ’17, perfectly accentuates every moment. Even the props, devised by Wendy Ginsberg ’15,  have lives of their own, evoking humor and brutal irony at pivotal moments.

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