Sextion: What we’re reading

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Hey guys!

Now, I know you have plenty of your own school-related reading to do, but take a break from it for a little and read about way more interesting things sex:

You have probably heard someone, likely a woman, described as having “no chill.” In the youth culture of America, “having chill” has become somewhat of a prerequisite in the dating scene. But does “having chill” simply mean that you don’t express your emotions? In her article “Against Chill,” Alana Massey explains the ways in which “Chill” (she capitalizes it in order to make it “a thing”) is actually “a sinister refashioning of ‘Calm down!’ from an enraging and highly gendered command into an admirable attitude.” If you only have time to read one of the articles in this post, pick this one! It made me question and reject a fairly long-held aspect of my dating persona: my “chill.”

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The face I made when Massey explained to me that expecting people to be “chill” in relationships is just another instrument of the patriarchy!!

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What we’re reading

What-were-reading

February is Black History Month. The New York Times is commemorating lesser known aspects of American Black history through their column “Unpublished Black History.” It is to be updated daily until March and will feature never before seen photos from the Times archives.

It’s a busy week in politics as the Iowa caucus takes place tonight, followed by the New Hampshire primary a week from today. Politico looked at the political consequences of America’s electoral process placing so much emphasis on early primary states in “How Iowa Hijacked Our Democracy,” while the New York Times editorial board outlined the importance of Iowa’s results in “The Cornfield Crucible.”

Meanwhile, Slate tried to uncover why math whiz Nate Silver, who started the statistics-driven FiveThirtyEight, was so wrong when he predicted Trump didn’t have a shot in the GOP primary. On a lighter note, check out Bernie Sanders singing “This Land Is Your Land” with Vampire Weekend at an Iowa rally.

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What we’re reading: The Paris, Beirut, and Baghdad attacks in a global context

We at Blog would like to extend our condolences to those who have been affected by recent and on-going attacks in Paris, Beirut, and elsewhere in the world. Thankfully, all 18 Brown students studying abroad in Paris were safe throughout the attacks. In light of recent events, this week’s “What we’re reading” will focus on the attacks in Paris, their international implications, and the international response by the media and society at large. At 5 p.m. today, Wednesday, November 18th, the Chaplains will host a “candlelight vigil to express our prayers, concern, and commitment to our global neighbors.” There will be a reception to follow in JWW 411.

On the night of Friday, November 13th, eight individuals killed at least 129 people and wounded over 350 others throughout Paris in an attack that has been linked to the Islamic State (ISIS). The eight attackers–seven of whom are dead–worked in three teams to carry out the attack that spanned the city, targeting several restaurants, the soccer stadium, and the Bataclan concert hall, where 89 victims were killed. The New York Times breaks down the timeline of events and the reaction of the French government.

French authorities have identified Abdelhamid Abaaoud, a 27-year-old Belgian man, as being responsible for orchestrating the attack, the New York Times reports. Authorities are also searching for Abdeslam Salam, 26, who is one of two French brothers living in Belgium who helped carry out the attack and is the only one of the eight attackers still at large.

The Saalam brothers lived in Molenbeek, a Belgian neighborhood that is largely populated by immigrants from the Arab world and has been linked to other attempted and successful attacks in Europe. Slate explores how Belgium became a hotbed for extremist activity. Politico reports that Jan Jambon, Belgium’s interior minister, is vowing to “clean up Molenbeek.” The implications of the connection of Belgians to the attacks are unclear as of yet. Jambon has not specified how he intends to “clean up” the area of concern. 

French President François Hollande declared that “France is at war” and enacted a state of emergency that he now proposes should be extended to three months, the Wall Street Journal reported. Under a state of emergency, the government can conduct raids without a proper search warrant. French officials conducted 168 raids early Monday morning throughout 19 departments, including Paris, Lyon, and Marseille. They arrested 23 people and put an additional 104 people under house arrest.

Looking Ahead (and Behind): ISIS, Immigration, and Islamophobia

France has expanded its aerial bombing of ISIS targets in Syria in response to the attack. They have dropped at least 20 bombs on Raqqa, Syria in the past couple days. Since the beginning of the Syrian Civil War in 2011, more than 200,000 Syrians have been killed and the country has been destabilized by various factions battling for control, including ISIS. The Atlantic outlines France’s role in fighting ISIS in Iraq since September of 2014. Olivier Roy, a professor at the European University Institute in Florence, wrote an op-ed for the New York Times outlining the geopolitical challenges to confronting ISIS and the likely course of action for France.

The conflict has displaced over  11 million Syrians, many of whom have migrated to Europe to escape the violence. For a more in-depth look at refugee resettlement, CNN has a report from September that looks at migrant flows. 

The attack in Paris raised concerns over accepting Syrian refugees into European countries after a Syrian passport was found near the body of one of the suicide bombers. The Guardian cautions against jumping to conclusions about the discovered Syrian passport. Because of the attack, several governments whose nations have been opening their doors to these refugees are receiving intensified backlash from various citizens. In Germany, a country considered friendly to migrants, debate has been especially pointed and a tense climate has emerged (discussed here in Time). 

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What we’re reading: Mizzou edition

Today, your Facebook feed was probably flooded with these statuses:

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We, at BlogDailyHerald, acknowledge that the events at University of Missouri’s campus are a symptom of much larger system of racism, violence and injustice. Tonight, we provide a reading list for those who have not gotten the chance to educate themselves on the immediate issues at hand.

Ever since September, when Payton Head, President of the Missouri Students Association, wrote a post on social media about receiving continuous racial slurs from a pick-up truck on campus, the student body has been ablaze with protest. For more detailed coverage on the events leading up to the erupting racial tensions, we turn to The Atlantic for an article titled “What’s Happening at the University of Missouri?” When calls for action from the administration were met with a lackluster effort at best, students blockaded then-President Wolfe’s car at the homecoming parade. He did not get out of the vehicle, and a graduate student, Jonathan Butler, was physically bumped as Wolfe’s driver continued moving the car through the crowd.

Butler went on to organize a hunger strike, with the intent of getting Wolfe to step down. He was supported by the student group Concerned Student 1950 – “named for the first year that the University of Missouri accepted black students.” (You can hear about the current thoughts of one of the first black students to attend University of Missouri in this New York Times piece.)

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What we’re reading

What we're reading

The second Democratic debate will take place this Saturday, and pollsters have been going crazy trying to predict who the nominee for both parties will be. This week, the New York Times asked readers to predict who they think will win each party’s nomination. Sorry Trump, but according to this piece, Hillary Rodham Clinton and Marco Rubio were most often mentioned. The Times also took into account the predicted VP choices.

In a similar vein, The New Yorker discussed the importance (if any) of Donald Trump’s appearance on Saturday Night Live last week. When the iconic show secured the candidate on the show, ratings soared; however, as the article argues, “the show didn’t, in any truly cutting way, make fun of Trump: it made fun of Trump voters, or at least the people it imagined them to be.” Make sure to check out future SNL skits surrounding the presidential election.

The climate surrounding racial issues on college campuses has been prominent in national and campus dialogue recently. From the Yale president telling Black students, “We failed you,” to the president of the University of Missouri system’s resignation on Monday, the conversation spans many topics and has incited action on the part of certain university administrations.

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What we’re reading

President Obama sat down with Bill Keller, Editor in Chief of the Marshall Project, to discuss the death penalty in America. The Marshall Project is a nonprofit news organization that seeks to inform the public about the injustices of the criminal justice system and incite reform through its work.

The Atlantic‘s “The Exemplary Narcissism of Snoopy” delves into the history of the Peanuts franchise, its author’s indignant nature, and the upcoming 3D animated movie. When the author Charles Schulz passed away in 2000, many thought the comic was done for, seeing as Schulz vowed that no new Peanuts strips would be produced. Fifteen years later, a feature-length movie is set to be released  on November 6th. Follow the evolution of the beloved characters throughout the decades in the piece.

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